Symposia, Conferences, and Series

Below you will find a chronological list of current CFR projects. You can search by issue or region by selecting the appropriate category. In addition to this sorting control, you can search for specific subjects within the alphabetical, regional, and issue categories by choosing from the selections in the drop-down menu below.

Each project page contains the name of the project director, a description of the project, a list of meetings it has held, and any related publications, transcripts, or videos.

1

1997-98 Shepardson Fellowship Roundtable

Director: Nicholas X. Rizopoulos, Senior Studies Editor, Council on Foreign Relations
October 1, 1997—May 1, 1998
This ongoing roundtable allows the current year's Shepardson Fellow to get feedback from relevant experts on discussion papers/chapters drawn from a book-in-progress. This year's Fellow was Tony Smith of Tufts University, whose book will address multiculturalism in U.S. foreign policy.

1996-97 Shepardson Fellowship Roundtable

Director: Nicholas X. Rizopoulos, Senior Studies Editor, Council on Foreign Relations
April 1, 1996—March 1, 1997
The Shepardson roundtable consists of a series of four to six seminar meetings with the current year's Shepardson Fellow as guest author and presenter of discussion papers/chapters drawn from a book manuscript in progress. The 1996-97 Shepardson Fellow was John Newhouse, who completed his new book Europe Adrift -- a study of the "New Europe" that will emerge by the end of the century.

2

2011 CFR-SWP Conference on the Atlantic World and Rising Global Powers

Director: Stewart M. Patrick, Senior Fellow and Director of the International Institutions and Global Governance Program
May 15, 2011—May 17, 2011

This workshop was cosponsored by the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) and the Council on Foreign Relations' (CFR) International Institutional and Global Governance (IIGG) program, and was made possible by the generous support of the Robina Foundation.

Summary Report from Berlin

2008 Foreign Policy Symposium

September 2, 2008—September 4, 2008

To view the archived video of each event, click the links below.

Panel Discussion: Foreign Policy Challenges Facing the Next Administration http://www.cfr.org/publication/17221

Panel Discussion: The Greater Middle East http://shows.implex.tv/Qwikcast/Root/Humphrey-Institute/1463/preflight2.htm

Panel Discussion: Democracy and America's Role in the World http://shows.implex.tv/Qwikcast/Root/Humphrey-Institute/1464/preflight2.htm

This symposium was underwritten by Chevron Corporation, The Coca-Cola Company, the Stanford Financial Group, and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

 

2008 Rocky Mountain Roundtable on International Relations

August 27, 2008

To view the archived video of each event, click the links below.

Panel Discussion: Enhancing the U.S. Role in the World http://fora.tv/2008/08/27/Enhancing_Americas_Role_Around_the_World

Luncheon Discussion: Foreign Policy Challenges Facing the Next Administration http://fora.tv/2008/08/27/Foreign_Policy_Challenges

Panel Discussion: Combating Global Poverty:http://fora.tv/2008/08/27/Combating_Global_Poverty_Panel_Discussion

These events were underwritten, in part, by Chevron Corporation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

A

Africa After 50 Roundtable Series

Director: Jendayi Frazer, Adjunct Senior Fellow for Africa Studies
March 11, 2011—Present

Africa After 50 is a roundtable series that examines new trends and regional dynamics that are shaping Africa's future and will impact U.S. policy opportunities on the continent. The emergence of new strategic players, especially China, India, and Middle Eastern countries, have created a more complex diplomatic landscape for the United States and African countries to navigate. Sustained economic growth over the past decade attracts interest in the region as a frontier and emerging market for global capital. Africa's entrepreneurs, rising urban middle classes and youth, and the introduction of new media are setting the stage for the next fifty years. Political stability and security remain fragile and depend on the increasing effectiveness of national and regional institutions. The African Union and sub-regional organizations in particular, have become more assertive in conflict resolution efforts across the continent, but long-term security will also require good governance innovation at the local and national levels. This series examines Africa's outlook after fifty years of independence from this new baseline by fostering discussion about the changing demographics, political and societal institutions, and the financial and physical infrastructure that will enable positive change. Hence the series focuses on new thinking and new strategies for Africa's transformation.

Asia and the World Roundtable Series

March 2009—Present

The Asia and the World roundtable series examines the global implications of the rise of Asian power. For a thousand years, Asia was the engine of the global economy, a locus of science and innovation, a center of ideas and intellectual ferment, and the nexus of global power. After a long hiatus, Asia's major powers have now reemerged on the global stage, but their interaction with one another, and with the United States, on important issues and challenges is unsettled and evolving. Speakers and participants analyze the reemergence of China and India as global players, the changing role of Japan on the international stage, and efforts to reshape the international architecture to accommodate the rise of China and India, in particular. Sessions also consider the ways in which greater involvement in the world, not just their immediate neighborhood, is changing the strategic, economic, and political calculations of major countries in East, Central, and South Asia. Meetings look at the tensions, opportunities, and constraints that will determine whether and how the United States can forge partnerships with major Asian powers on issues of global scope. Other sessions may examine timely issues that arise in Central Asia, such as connections to the international oil and gas market, international institutions, and the global economy.

An Action Plan for the United States: Promoting Political and Economic Liberalization in the Middle East

Staff: Elliot Schrage, Adjunct Senior Fellow for Business and Foreign Policy
January 1, 2005—Present

This study will test the hypothesis that an incentive-based policy is more effective in promoting market economies and democratic politics than an approach in which Washington relies on the ostensibly transformative effects of civil society, regime change in Iraq, regional peace, or the willingness of Arab leaders to pursue reform.

Arthur C. Helton Memorial Lecture

January 1, 2005—Present

The Arthur C. Helton Memorial Lecture was established by the Council and the family of Arthur C. Helton, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations who died in the August 2003 bombing of the UN headquarters in Baghdad. The Helton Lectureship is an annual event at which one or more speakers address pressing issues in the broad field of human rights and humanitarian concerns.

Africa Policy Studies Roundtable

Staff: Princeton N. Lyman
January 28, 2003—September 1, 2010

The Africa Roundtable Series will meet periodically during the 2007-2008 programming year in both New York City and Washington, DC. As always, the series will seek to provide a representative sampling of the prospects and problems on the African continent, but special focus will likely be given to the evolving crisis in Zimbabwe, the ongoing attempts to stabilize the Great Lakes Region, and the political situation in Nigeria. During 2006-2007, the series hosted Amos Kimunya, Finance Minister of Kenya; Tony Leon, leader of the official opposition in South Africa; and Atiku Abubakar, Vice-President of Nigeria, among others.

America, Europe, and the World Roundtable

Staff: James M. Goldgeier, Dean, School of International Service, American University
October 1, 2007—June 30, 2010

The goal of the America, Europe, and the World roundtable series is to examine how America and Europe can move forward with a constructive transatlantic agenda for managing problems that arise outside of North America and Europe.

A Blueprint for a Sustainable Energy Partnership of the Americas

December 2008—April 2009

This project will develop a framework for a Sustainable Energy Partnership for the Americas that goes beyond bilateral agreements and adopts a regional approach towards sustainable growth and clean energy. The objective of this project is to draft a blueprint that will explore, and ultimately define, pathways for collaboration among American states in order to deliver solutions to the region's energy challenges. The blueprint document will be presented at the Summit of the Americas which will take place in Trinidad and Tobago in April 2009 and will also be available on our website at that time.

This initiative is a collaboration between scholars and receives support from the Center for International Governance and Innovation, Canada; the Council on Foreign Relations, United States; Centro Brasileiro de Relações Internacionais, Brazil; and University of West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago.

At the Council on Foreign Relations, this project is part of the Latin America Studies Program and the International Institutions and Global Governance Program. It is made possible by the generous support of Ford Foundation, the Robina Foundation, and the Tinker Foundation.

Afghanistan, Pakistan, and U.S. National Security Symposium

Staff: Kay King, Former Vice President, Washington Initiatives
April 21, 2009

Last month, President Obama unveiled the details of a new strategy for Afghanistan and Pakistan, explaining, "The future of Afghanistan is inextricably linked to the future of its neighbor, Pakistan." As the White House has been preparing to put its plan into action, the Council on Foreign Relations held a multisession, half-day symposium in Washington, DC, intended to provide members and experts an opportunity to examine the central questions surrounding U.S. involvement in the region.

The first panel assessed the situation in the region; the second addressed specific policy options. The event concluded with a conversation with Senator Joseph I. Lieberman (ID-CT).

American Foreign Policy and the Global Middle Class

Staff: Walter Russell Mead, Henry A. Kissinger Senior Fellow for U.S. Foreign Policy
January 1, 2005—June 30, 2007

Walter Russell Mead is examining the emergence of a middle class in several developing economies and studying the implication of this new force for American foreign policy. The project compares the political role that the middle class played in promoting democracy during the process of industrialization in the West with the role the middle class is playing today in promoting democracy in the Third World.