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Council on Foreign Relations Educators Bulletin
Resources for the Academic Community

June 2012

New CFR Ebook Analyzes Options for Addressing Iran's Nuclear Activities

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In Iran: The Nuclear Challenge, seven CFR experts discuss the tools and strategies for coping with one of the most significant foreign policy challenges the world currently faces. Edited by former deputy national security adviser Robert D. Blackwill, this CFR ebook helps readers understand the policy choices available to the United States and their potential consequences. With a range of viewpoints, this text does not advocate any particular policy, but rather provides students the background for how to think critically about different policy options. Read an Excerpt and Request an Exam Copy

 

New Online Channel Highlights Research on Economic Development

CFR's new Development Channel showcases debates on and approaches to economic development, including topics such as food security, foreign aid, global health, education, and more. With commentary and analysis by CFR scholars Terra Lawson-Remer and Isobel Coleman, as well as guest posts, this site serves as a forum for multiple voices on complex issues regarding opportunity and exclusion in the global economy. Encourage students to check the channel regularly and respond to posts with their own opinions and analysis. Join the Conversation »

CFR Working Paper Argues that the United States Has Changed the UN Human Rights Council For the Better

Suzanne Nossel, executive director of Amnesty International USA, discusses how U.S. engagement with the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) has led to significant improvements, and offers recommendations for building upon this positive momentum. Use this resource to lead a class discussion on whether students agree or disagree with Nossel's assertion that the United States has enhanced UNHRC's effectiveness. Download the Working Paper »

In the Classroom: CFR at the National Speech & Debate Tournament

On June 15, CFR.org's Editor Robert McMahon judged a round of the international extemporaneous speaking event at the largest academic competition in the United States. The theme of this event, focusing on international relations and U.S. foreign policy, was "The World Next Week," modeled after CFR's weekly podcast series in which Mr. McMahon and CFR's Director of Studies James M. Lindsay preview major international events in the week ahead. Use these podcasts to organize a mock debate tournament in your classroom where students can be both participants and judges.


WOMEN AND WAR

New Academic Module Focuses on Female Entrepreneurship in Afghanistan

For a class on Afghanistan, global political economy, international development, gender studies, and more, build your syllabus using this Academic Module based on The Dressmaker of Khair Khana by CFR's Gayle Tzemach Lemmon. Use the teaching notes and supplemental CFR resources to integrate this text on a female-run business which thrived under the Taliban into your curriculum. Explore the Academic Module »

Leading Scholars Weigh In On Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict Zones

In light of the recent reintroduction of the International Violence Against Women Act (I-VAWA), CFR's Micah Zenko asked six experts to advise on what policymakers should know about sexual violence during conflict and effective policy responses for preventing it. Have students use these responses to develop a congressional testimony in favor of passing I-VAWA. Read the Responses »

CRISIS IN EGYPT

A "Coup" in Egypt?

In this article, CFR's Steven A. Cook explains why Egypt's "'something-not-quite-coup' is not as rare as one might suspect." Have students write an essay analyzing how the aftermath of similar coups in Turkey and Algeria compare to what might happen in Egypt. Access the Article »

Understanding the Muslim Brotherhood

This comprehensive, recently updated CFR Backgrounder provides information on the Muslim Brotherhood's history, ideology, and influence on U.S.-Egypt relations. Share the link with students to provide context for understanding the significance of the recent presidential win by Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohamed Morsi. Explore the Backgrounder »

FOREIGN AFFAIRS HIGHLIGHTS

The links below allow you special access to these subscribers-only articles from the July/August edition of Foreign Affairs.

"Why Iran Should Get the Bomb"

As the United States grapples with how to respond to the potential of a nuclear-armed Iran, Kenneth N. Waltz, senior research scholar at the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, argues that a nuclear Iran would actually restore stability to the Middle East. Assign students to write an op-ed in response to the essay agreeing or disagreeing with Waltz's assertion.

"Environmental Alarmism, Then and Now"

In 1972, the Club of Rome's groundbreaking report, "The Limits to Growth," claimed that unchecked economic growth would destroy the planet. On the fortieth anniversary of the report's publication, Bjorn Lomborg, adjunct professor at the Copenhagen Business School, revisits the authors' arguments and discusses why they were ultimately flawed. Use this essay to lead a class discussion on the real threats to the environment, and the best ways to convince policymakers to pay attention to them.

 

 

About CFR

The Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) is an independent, nonpartisan membership organization, think tank, and publisher dedicated to being a resource for its members, government officials, business executives, journalists, educators and students, civic and religious leaders, and other interested citizens in order to help them better understand the world and the foreign policy choices facing the United States and other countries. Founded in 1921, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy.

About CFR’s Academic Outreach Initiative

The CFR Academic Outreach Initiative provides a forum for educators and students to interact with CFR experts and join the debate on foreign policy. The purpose is to foster a deeper understanding of international relations and the role of the United States in the world. Programs include the Academic Conference Call Series; live streaming of CFR meetings; workshops for college and university presidents and deans, professors, and high school teachers; briefings for students; exhibitions and events at conferences across the country; and disseminating CFR print and multimedia resources for teaching and learning about global issues. For more information, please contact academic@cfr.org.

 

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