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Highlights From CFR

July 20, 2012

The World This Week

Israel Wants U.S. To Do More on Syria and Iran Crises

Elliott Abrams

Israel's collapsing government remains concerned about U.S. policies toward Syria and Iran. Also, Israel is watching and waiting to see who wins the U.S. presidential election before dealing with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Read the interview »

Syria

U.S. Should Bypass the UN on Syria

Richard N. Haass

The United States and other like-minded governments should not equate the United Nations with multilateralism, nor should they see the UN as having a monopoly on legitimacy. Read the First Take »

What to Remember On Intervening in Syria

Paul B. Stares

With the defeat of the UN Security Council resolution, the international community must remember that while the decision to intervene may initially be motivated by a limited set of objectives, military involvement often expands into other missions. Watch the video »

Russia Won't Yield on Syria

Dimitri Simes

Russian president Vladimir Putin, mistrustful of Western motives, is resisting pressure to commit to stronger sanctions against Syria's government. Read the interview »

Syria's Crisis and the Global Response

International efforts to ease Syria's crisis have been limited by divisions in the UN Security Council and a wariness about a military response. Read the Backgrounder »

 

More Evidence That Libor Is Hazardous to Economic Health

Geo-Graphics

The European Central Bank efforts to tamp down European funding rates have already diminished Libor's usefulness as a measure of market tension. View the Geo-Graphic »

Understanding the Libor Scandal

An investigation into the manipulation of interbank lending rates could have repercussions for financial markets, consumer loans, and regulatory policy. Read the Backgrounder »

The World Ahead

Would a Nuclear Iran Make the Middle East More Secure?

Colin H. Kahl and Kenneth N. Waltz

A nuclear-armed Iran would not make the Middle East more secure, argues Colin Kahl; it would yield more terrorism and pose a risk of a nuclear exchange. Kenneth Waltz maintains that nuclear deterrence enhances stability, and if the price is more low-level conflict, so be it. Read the response on ForeignAffairs.com »

Americans Concerned About Iran Getting the Bomb

Stewart M. Patrick

A new U.S. public opinion poll shows that Americans are deeply concerned about Iranian acquisition of the bomb, yet favor sanctions over military force by a wide margin. Read the blog post on The Internationalist »

Escalating Vaccine Tensions in Pakistan

Laurie Garrett

Efforts to vaccinate Pakistani children are in peril after the CIA's vaccine ploy to help capture Osama bin Laden, placing the entire region at risk of outbreaks. Read the First Take »

A South African Take on the U.S. Presidential Race

Moeletsi Mbeki

South Africans strongly favor President Obama's reelection. They are enthusiastic about his pro-democracy message and appreciate the Democratic party's support for the anti-apartheid movement. Read the interview »

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World Events Calendar

July 23: Egypt Celebrates Anniversary of the 1952 Revolution
CFR Resources on: Egypt

July 25: United Nations Security Council to Debate Somalia, Iraq, and the Middle East
CFR Resources on: UN

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Inside CFR

Symposium on Preventing Genocide:: Secretary of State Hillary Clinton will headline this event hosted by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, in cooperation with CFR and CNN, on July 24. Results from a public opinion poll on Americans' knowledge of and attitudes towards genocide and its prevention will be unveiled. Sign up to watch the Symposium

 

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