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United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change: Warsaw Conference, November 2013

Published November 22, 2013

United Nations Climate Change Conference met Warsaw November 11-22, 2013. The conference aims to keep governments on track towards a universal climate agreement in 2015.

Excerpt from the closing press release discussing main agreements:

"In the context of 2015, countries decided to initiate or intensify domestic preparation for their intended national contributions towards th at agreement, which will come into force from 2020. Parties ready to do this will submit clear and transparent plans well in advance of COP 21 , in Paris, and by the first quarter of 2015 . Countries also resolved to close the pre-2020 ambition gap by intensifying technical work and more frequent engagement of Ministers.

The conference also decided to establish an international mechanism to provide most vulnerable populations with better protection against loss and damage caused by extreme weather events and slow onset events such as rising sea levels. Detailed work on the so-called "Warsaw international mechanism for loss and damage" will begin next year. In addition, governments provided more clarity on mobilizing finance to support developing country actions to curb emissions and adapt to climate change. This includes requesting developed countries to prepare biennial submissions on their updated strategies and approaches for scaling up finance between 2014 and 2020. The Warsaw meeting also resulted in concrete announcements of forthcoming contributions of public climate finance to support developing nation action, including from Norway, the UK, EU, US, Republic of Korea, Japan, Sweden, Germany and Finland.

Meanwhile, the Green Climate Fund Board is to commence its initial resource mobilization process as soon as possible and developed countries were asked for ambitious, timely contributions by COP 20, in December, next year, to enable an effective operationalization.

Cutting emissions from deforestation

Today's agreements included a significant set of decisions on ways to help developing countries reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and the degradation of forests, which account for around one fifth of all human-generated emissions. The Warsaw Framework for REDD+ is backed by pledges of 280 million dollars financing from the US, Norway and the UK.

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Further progress in help for developing nations

In Warsaw, a milestone was passed after 48 of the poorest countries of the world finalized a comprehensive set of plans to deal with the inevitable impacts of climate change. With these plans, the countries can better assess the immediate impacts of climate change and what they need in the way of support to become more resilient. Developed countries, including Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland have also paid or pledged over 100 million dollars to add to the Adaptation Fund , which has now started to fund natio nal projects.

Governments completed work on the Climate Technology Centre and Network (CTCN) so that it can immediately respond to requests from developing countries for advice and assistance on the transfer of technology. The CTCN is open for business an d is encouraging developing countries to set up focal points to accelerate the transfer of technology.

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