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The Atlantic: Greater Competitiveness Does Not Have to Mean Greater Inequality

Author: Richard Florida
October 11, 2011

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Socioeconomic parity within a country is not a detriment to the country's competitiveness, claims Richard Florida.

Last week, I discussed how the nations of the world stack up in terms of innovation, the Creative Class, and a new overall measure of creativity and competitiveness, the Global Creativity Index (GCI). Today, I look at the bigger picture of economic prosperity, examining the connections (or lack of connections) between competitiveness and happiness, socioeconomic inequality and overall social and economic progress.

Let's start with a basic question: Do more creative and innovative economies gain an edge in economic development and competitiveness? The short answer is yes.

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