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The Atlantic: Why Innovation Can't Fix America's Classrooms

Author: Marc Tucker
December 6, 2011

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Marc Tucker claims the most effective means to improve U.S. education is to imitate the methods used by the best-performing countries.

Most Atlantic readers know that, although the U.S. spends more per student on K-12 education than any other nation except Luxembourg, students in a growing number of nations outperform our own. But think about this: Among the consistent top performers are not only developed nations (Japan, Finland, Canada), but developing countries and mega-cities such as South Korea, Hong Kong, and Shanghai.

Even if we find a way to educate our future work force to the same standards as this latter group -- and we are a very long way from that now -- wages in the United States will continue to decline unless we outperform those countries enough to justify our higher wages. That is a very tall order.


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