Educators

January 12, 2011

In this issue:

CFR IN THE CLASSROOM: UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI'S AMBLER H. MOSS JR.


University of Miami's professor Ambler H. Moss Jr. uses How Enemies Become Friends: The Sources of Stable Peace by CFR Senior Fellow Charles A. Kupchan for his course on the United Nations. Ambassador Moss describes it as an “excellent blend of international relations theory, international law, and the art of negotiation. It will give students a good appreciation of the complexities of contemporary issues and will stimulate their thinking about possible solutions.”

==> Visit the CFR Educators Portal for more resources for the classroom.

FOREIGN AFFAIRS HIGHLIGHTS FROM JAN/FEB ISSUE


Featured Article:

"Sudan’s Secession Crisis: Can the South Part from the North Without War?"


In advance of the recent secession referendum in Sudan, Andrew S. Natsios and Michael Abramowitz wrote on the prospects for compromise and reconciliation between the country's north and south.


Featured Book Reviews:

West is Best? Why Civilizations Rise and Fall

Duke University professor Timur Kuran shares an in-depth review of Why the West Rules--For Now by Stanford University’s Ian Morris.

Why the Rich Are Getting Richer: American Politics and the Second Gilded Age

Columbia University professor Robert C. Lieberman reviews Winner-Take-All Politics by Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson.

UPCOMING ACADEMIC CONFERENCE CALL


CFR Academic Conference Call Series


ENERGY INNOVATION ABROAD


Wednesday, February 2, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m. (ET)

Speakers: MICHAEL LEVI, David M. Rubenstein Senior Fellow for Energy and the Environment, CFR; Coathor, Energy Innovation

SHANNON K. O'NEIL, Douglas Dillon Fellow for Latin America Studies, CFR; Coathor, Energy Innovation


To RSVP, please email educators@cfr.org or call Isabella Santoro at 212.434.9573. Invitations are transferable but limited to professors and students; please share with interested colleagues!

==> Visit the CFR Educators Portal for the complete Winter/Spring 2011 Academic Conference Call schedule.

RENEWING U.S. POWER ABROAD


Reviving U.S. Power Abroad from Within


Seven experts offer ideas for bolstering U.S. leadership abroad by resolving pressing domestic issues, such as reforming budgetary and trade policies, improving infrastructure and education, and overhauling immigration policy.

==> Read Richard N. Haass and Roger C. Altman’s Foreign Affairs article, “American Profligacy and American Power,” in which they discuss the consequences of U.S. fiscal irresponsibility.

NEW CONGRESS AND THE DEFICIT


New Congress and the Spending Thicket


In this First Take, CFR’s James M. Lindsay discusses how the new Congress is likely to be dominated by partisan squabbles over debts and deficits, thus sidelining foreign policy.

==> Read more about politics and foreign policy on Dr. Lindsay's blog, "The Water's Edge."

INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGY


Advantage: How American Innovation Can Overcome the Asian Challenge


In his new CFR book, CFR’s Adam Segal focuses on the drivers and constraints of innovation, as well as the advantages the United States can leverage over emerging economic powers, such as India and China, to maintain its technological lead on the world stage.

==> Find more CFR resources on Technology and Foreign Policy.

NEW START TREATY


Why New START Was Ratified


Support of the U.S. national security establishment was crucial in gaining Senate ratification of the New START treaty, says CFR’s Stephen Sestanovich, but follow-on arms control agreements between the U.S. and Russia face a tough road.

==> View the CFR Global Governance Monitor's interactive guide on Nuclear Proliferation.

POLITICAL CRISIS IN PAKISTAN


Pakistan's Road to Disintegration


In this CFR interview, Pakistan expert Stephen P. Cohen discusses how the faltering government and the assassination of the governor of Pakistan's Punjab Province, Salman Taseer, are symptomatic of wider and deeper problems in a country that is  fundamentally falling apart.

==> Explore the CFR interactive Crisis Guide on Pakistan.