Educators

September 5, 2006

In this issue:

ACADEMIC CONFERENCE CALL SERIES

2006 Fall Semester Schedule

To participate in the Academic Conference Call Series, we ask that professors gather their students around a speaker phone and dial in a few minutes prior to each call. The speaker will make a ten minute presentation, and then students will have the opportunity to ask questions for the remainder of the hour. For more information or to RSVP, please email educators@cfr.org.


France and Its Muslims

Thursday, September 14, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Speaker: Stephanie Giry, Senior Editor, Foreign Affairs


The Shia Revival

Thursday, September 28, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Speaker: Vali Nasr, Adjunct Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies Studies, CFR


U.S. Trade Policy: Free Versus Fair

Wednesday, October 11, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Speaker: Daniel Drezner, Associate Professor of International Politics, The Fletcher School, Tufts University and Author, U.S. Trade Policy: Free Versus Fair, a CFR Critical Policy Choices Book


Asia Update

Thursday, October 26, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Speaker: Evans J.R. Revere, Cyrus Vance Fellow in Diplomatic Studies, CFR


Foreign Affairs Author

Thursday, November 9, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Speaker: TBD


War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History, 1500 to Today

Thursday, November 30, 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Speaker: Max Boot, Senior Fellow for National Security Studies, CFR

FEATURED ACADEMIC MODULE: CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENT

The River Runs Black: The Environmental Challenge to China’s Future

Selected by The Globalist as one of the top ten books of 2004, The River Runs Black is the most comprehensive and balanced volume to date on China’s growing environmental crisis and its implications for the country’s development.

Academic modules include teaching notes by the author, as well as additional background readings, Foreign Affairs articles, audio and video files, and transcripts of Council meetings to supplement your syllabus.

MULTIMEDIA RESOURCES: THE MIDDLE EAST

The Current Conflict in The Middle East

July 31, 2006

Speaker: Shimon Peres, Vice Premier, Israel

Presider: Mortimer B. Zuckerman, Editor In Chief, U.S. News & World Report


A Conversation with Fouad Ajami (part of the Iraq: The Way Forward series)

July 11, 2006

Speaker: Fouad Ajami, Author, The Foreigner’s Gift: The Americans, the Arabs, and the Iraqis in Iraq; and M. Khadduri Professor of Middle Eastern Studies, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Presider: Leslie H. Gelb, President Emeritus, Council on Foreign Relations


NEW COUNCIL SPECIAL REPORT: U.S.-TURKEY RELATIONS

Generating Momentum for a New Era in U.S.-Turkey Relations

The Council’s Douglas Dillon Fellow Steven A. Cook and Adjunct Senior Fellow for Alliance Relations Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall outline a simultaneous, two-track approach for immediate implementation by the United States and Turkey to rebuild their historically collaborative relationship.

NEW COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS BOOK: HIDDEN IRAN

Hidden Iran: Paradox and Power in the Islamic Republic

by Ray Takeyh, Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, CFR

A groundbreaking book that reveals how the underappreciated domestic political rivalries within Iran serve to explain the country’s behavior on the world stage. A leading expert explains why we fail to understand Iran and offers a new strategy for redefining this crucial relationship.

COUNCIL-SPONSORED INDEPENDENT TASK FORCE REPORT: U.S.-RUSSIA RELATIONS

Russia's Wrong Direction: What the United States Can and Should Do

John Edwards, Former Democratic nominee for Vice President of the United States

Jack Kemp, Former Republican nominee for Vice President of the United States

Stephen Sestanovich, George F. Kennan Senior Fellow for Russian and Eurasian Studies, CFR

Since the end of the Cold War, successive American administrations have sought to create a relationship with Russia that they called a “partnership.” This report asserts that this is the right long-term goal, but it is unfortunately not a realistic prospect for U.S.-Russia relations over the next several years.