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Pew: Egypt, Democracy and Islam

Author: Richard Auxier
January 31, 2011

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This survey by Pew reveals an even split between Egyptians who value a prominent role for religion in government and those who consider religion to play a small role. The poll also explores Egyptians' attitudes towards democracy and other considerations that will factor into Egypt's uncertain future.

With massive protests threatening to upend the three-decades-long reign of President Hosni Mubarak, the world has been captivated by the events in Egypt. In a survey conducted April 12 to May 7, 2010, the Pew Research Center's Global Attitudes Project examined the views of Egypt and six other Muslim publics about politics and the role Islam should play in it.

A 59%-majority of Muslims in Egypt believed that democracy was preferable to any other kind of government. About one-in-five (22%), however, said that in some circumstances, a non-democratic government could be preferable, and another 16% said it did not matter what kind of government is in place for a person in their situation.

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