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Why ‘Peace’ Was Catchphrase in Presidential Debate

Author: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon, Senior Fellow for Women and Foreign Policy
October 23, 2012
Reuters

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Foreign policy attempted to take center stage at the presidential debate Monday evening but failed resoundingly. For the candidates agreed to agree on a number of key issues — the timeline for ending America's longest war, support for Israel, and the importance of diplomacy and sanctions in Iran. Nation-building at home trumped nation-building abroad, and small business won as many mentions from the nominees as the death of Osama bin Laden. It was no accident that the contenders talked about teachers more than Libya.

What both President Barack Obama and his GOP challenger Mitt Romney made clear to a nation exhausted by one decade of two bloody wars: The era of big military interventions is over. Romney, who earlier in the campaign sounded poised to embrace a more activist foreign policy, embraced a loudly centrist worldview that eschewed saber-rattling in favor of promoting entrepreneurship and civil society.

"Peaceful" was the night's catchphrase for Romney, who told the president, "we can't kill our way out of this mess." This key word is likely to resonate with the women voters his campaign now sees as both critical to victory and open to his more centrist message.

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