image

Matthew C. Waxman

Adjunct Senior Fellow for Law and Foreign Policy

Expertise

International law & national security law; human rights; law and terrorism; counterterrorism; international security; presidential powers and foreign policy; cybersecurity; military intervention.

Featured Publications

Video Speaker: Matthew C. Waxman

Civil liberties will present the winner of the 2012 U.S. presidential elections with challenges related to counterterrorism powers and practices, as well as challenges related to privacy rights, says CFR's Matthew C. Waxman.

See more in Elections

Council Special Report No. 49

Intervention to Stop Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Author: Matthew C. Waxman

Recent events in Darfur raise the familiar question of whether international law facilitates the kind of early, decisive, and coherent action needed to effectively combat genocide. Matthew C. Waxman argues that putting decisions about international intervention solely in the hands of the UN Security Council risks undermining the threat or use of intervention when it may be most potent in stopping mass atrocities.

See more in United States; Genocide; Humanitarian Intervention

All Publications

Interview

Shahzad Arrest Ignites Liberties Debate

Matthew C. Waxman interviewed by Bernard Gwertzman

The Times Square bomb plot has triggered questions about when and whether suspect Faisal Shahzad, a Pakistan-born American citizen, should have been informed of his Miranda rights. These questions are likely to gain traction in the weeks ahead, says expert Matthew C. Waxman, who believes it would be wrong to treat all captured terrorists as enemy combatants subject to military trial.

See more in Terrorism and the Law; United States

Council Special Report No. 49

Intervention to Stop Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Author: Matthew C. Waxman

Recent events in Darfur raise the familiar question of whether international law facilitates the kind of early, decisive, and coherent action needed to effectively combat genocide. Matthew C. Waxman argues that putting decisions about international intervention solely in the hands of the UN Security Council risks undermining the threat or use of intervention when it may be most potent in stopping mass atrocities.

See more in United States; Genocide; Humanitarian Intervention

CFR Events

General Meeting ⁄ New York

What to Do About Guantanamo Bay

Speakers:

Phillip Carter, Senior Fellow, Center for a New American Security; Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Policy, U.S. Department of Defense, Marc A. Thiessen, Fellow, American Enterprise Institute; Former Chief Speechwriter to President George W. Bush, The White House, Matthew C. Waxman, Professor, Columbia Law School; Adjunct Senior Fellow for Law and Foreign Policy, Council on Foreign Relations

Presider:

Richard N. Haass, President, Council on Foreign Relations
April 22, 2014 12:30-1:00 p.m. - Lunch
1:00-2:00 p.m. - Meeting

This meeting is on the record.

ListenWatch

Academic Conference Call

Combating Mass Atrocities

Speaker:

Matthew C. Waxman, Adjunct Senior Fellow for Law and Foreign Policy, Council on Foreign Relations; Author, Intervention to Stop Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Presider:

Irina A. Faskianos, Vice President, National Program & Outreach, Council on Foreign Relations
February 24, 2010

This meeting is not for attribution.

Listen

Conference Panel Session

The United States and the Future of Global Governance: The Use of Force and Accountability in International Law - A U.S. Perspective

Speakers:

Matthew C. Waxman, Adjunct Senior Fellow for Law and Foreign Policy, Council on Foreign Relations, John B. Bellinger III, Adjunct Senior Fellow for International and National Security Law, Council on Foreign Relations, David J. Scheffer, Professor of Law, Northwestern University

Moderator:

Jeffrey Toobin, Staff Writer, The New Yorker
May 7, 2009 - May 8, 2009

This meeting is on the record.

ListenWatch

Press/Panels

Panel

Ten Years after 9/11: Evaluating a Decade of Conflicts on the Rules of War

The United States Institute of Peace (USIP) and the American Red Cross hosted a discussion on the relevance and importance of international humanitarian law at a time when civil conflicts are erupting in North Africa and the Middle East. An audio recording of the event is also available.

Article

The New York Times: Torture's Blowback

On the New York Times' "Room for Debate" blog, Matthew Waxman joins other experts for a discussion of how admissions of torture might affect the closure of the Guantanamo military detention facility and the prosecution of detainees.

Testimony

Guantanamo Detainees - Now What?

In a 2008 prepared testimony to the United States Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe (Helsinki Commission), Matthew Waxman discusses the legal and policy decisions regarding the future of the Guantanamo Bay detention facility and the possibility of closing it down.

Bio

Matthew C. Waxman is adjunct senior fellow for law and foreign policy at the Council on Foreign Relations. He is also professor at Columbia Law School and a member of the Hoover Institution's task force on national security and law.

He previously served at the U.S. Department of State as principal deputy director of policy planning. His prior government appointments included deputy assistant secretary of defense for detainee affairs, director for contingency planning and international justice at the National Security Council, and special assistant to the national security adviser. He is a graduate of Yale College and Yale Law School, and studied international relations as a Fulbright scholar in the United Kingdom. After law school, he served as law clerk to Supreme Court justice David H. Souter and U.S. Court of Appeals judge Joel M. Flaum.

His publications include The Dynamics of Coercion: American Foreign Policy and the Limits of Military Might (with Daniel Byman, Cambridge University Press, 2002) and the CFR special report Intervention To Stop Genocide and Mass Atrocities: International Norms and U.S. Policy (2009).