image

Daniel S. Markey

Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia

Expertise

South Asia; U.S. foreign policy; international security; international relations theory.

Programs

Asia Program

Bio

Daniel Markey is senior fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), where he specializes in security and governance issues in South Asia. He is the author of a book on the future of the U.S.-Pakistan relationship, No Exit from Pakistan: America's Tortured Relationship with Islamabad (Cambridge University Press, October 2013).

From 2003 to 2007, Dr. Markey held the South Asia portfolio on the Secretary's Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State. Prior to government service, he taught in the Department of Politics at Princeton University, where he served as executive director of Princeton's Research Program in International Security. Earlier, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard's Olin Institute for Strategic Studies.

Dr. Markey is the author of numerous publications, including the January 2014 CFR Special Report, Reorienting U.S. Pakistan Strategy: From Af-Pak to Asia; the February 2013 CFR Policy Innovation Memorandum, Support Process Over Policy in Pakistan; the September 2011 CFR Asia Security Memorandum, Pakistan Contingencies; the May 2011 CFR Policy Innovation Memorandum, Next Steps for Pakistan Strategy; the January 2010 CFR Contingency Planning Memorandum, Terrorism and Indo-Pakistani Escalation; and a chapter of the Random House e-book, Beyond bin Laden: America and the Future of Terror. He served as project director of the CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force on U.S. strategy in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Dr. Markey's commentary has been featured widely, including in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, and Christian Science Monitor. He has appeared on PBS, CNN, BBC, NPR, CBS, ABC, and C-SPAN.

Dr. Markey earned a bachelor's degree in international studies from The Johns Hopkins University and a doctorate in politics from Princeton University. He has been awarded grants from the Smith Richardson and MacArthur foundations to support his research.

The Future of U.S.-Pakistan Relations

Pakistan's internal troubles already threaten U.S. security and international peace, and Pakistan's rapidly growing population, nuclear arsenal, and relationships with China and India will continue to force it onto the United States' geostrategic map in new and important ways over the coming decades. Most immediately, the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan is drawing down and the nature of the relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan is likely to shift as a consequence. As I argued in my January 2014 Council Special Report, Reorienting U.S. Pakistan Strategy: From Af-Pak to Asia, any U.S. strategy for the rest of Asia that does not include Pakistan's role is incomplete, and a strategy for Pakistan that only considers its role in the context of Afghanistan is shortsighted. In articles, op-eds, and my recent book, No Exit from Pakistan: America's Tortured Relationship with Islamabad, I assess the U.S. relationship with Pakistan and recommend how Washington's policymakers should craft more effective policies for the future. I also convene a South Asia Roundtable Series to address similar topics with U.S. government officials, academics, and private sector analysts.

The New Geopolitics of China, India, and Pakistan

The emergence of China and more recently, India, has reshaped relations and produced a broader area of economic integration in Asia. Even in southern Asia, where the strategic triangle of China, India, and Pakistan has resulted in flashpoints and suspicions, both India and China have kept their sights on increasing trade and economic growth as a security imperative for the long term. However, southern Asia's security, political, and economic foundations face stresses that could profoundly alter its evolution, usher in the return of geopolitics, and reshape political and economic relations globally. This project will explore potential flashpoints and promising areas for cooperation among China, India, and Pakistan—and identify areas where the United States can help. Over the next two years, I will explore these issues with my colleagues Alyssa Ayres and Elizabeth Economy in a roundtable series and several publications. The project will culminate in a capstone symposium and a Council report in 2016.

This project is made possible through the support of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

China's "Go West" Strategy

In recent years, Beijing has signaled a new interest in the states of its western periphery by announcing plans for a "New Silk Road," "Maritime Silk Road," and a China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, among other high profile initiatives. China's westward interests start with the vast energy resources of Central Asia and the Middle East, but other security and economic concerns are leading Beijing to focus greater attention westward, from Kazakhstan to Sri Lanka, Pakistan to Saudi Arabia. What are the likely consequences of China's expanded commercial, diplomatic, and strategic activity? Will China exacerbate or soothe tensions between India and Pakistan, or between Iran and Saudi Arabia? Will Afghanistan benefit from Chinese investment and enhanced diplomatic attention? Will Russia's influence in Central Asia be displaced by China's wealth and unquenchable thirst for energy? For the United States, the answers to these and other questions will determine whether China's westward march presents a geostrategic threat, a new opportunity for greater cooperation, or merely a distraction from other pressing global concerns. My research and travel will culminate with an assessment of the present state and future potential of China's "Go West" strategy and its consequences for the United States.

Featured Publications

All Publications

Contingency Planning Memorandum

Terrorism and Indo-Pakistani Escalation

Author: Daniel S. Markey

India faces the real prospect of another major terrorist attack by Pakistan-based terrorist organizations in the near future, an event that would jeopardize important U.S. security interests in South Asia. This Center for Preventive Action Contingency Planning Memorandum examines the factors that would condition India's response; the consequences of Indian military retaliation and Pakistani counterretaliation for the United States; and Washington's policy options for preventing and containing the crisis.

See more in India; Terrorist Attacks

Events

South Asia Roundtable Series

Director: Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia
May 2007—Present

The South Asia Roundtable Series examines the major issues facing South Asia today. On Afghanistan, speakers and participants analyze stability, reconstruction, and counterinsurgency efforts. For sessions on Pakistan, they consider many aspects of the nature of the U.S.-Pakistan partnership, ranging from counterterrorism cooperation to issues of governance. Meetings on India look at the U.S.-India relationship and the tensions, limits, and opportunities that will define the American relationship with India moving forward. Other sessions may also examine timely issues that arise in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, or Nepal.

CFR Events

Guest Event ⁄ New York

CFR Fellows' Book Launch Series: No Exit from Pakistan--America's Tortured Relationship with Islamabad

Speaker:

Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations; Author, No Exit from Pakistan: America's Tortured Relationship with Islamabad

Presider:

James M. Lindsay, Senior Vice President, Director of Studies, and Maurice R. Greenberg Chair, Council on Foreign Relations
October 21, 2013 5:30-6:00 p.m. - Cocktail Reception
6:00-6:45 p.m. - Meeting
6:45-7:15 p.m. - Cocktail Reception and Book Signing

This meeting is on the record.

ListenWatch

Guest Event ⁄ Washington

No Exit from Pakistan: America's Tortured Relationship with Islamabad

Speaker:

Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations; Author, No Exit from Pakistan

Presider:

James M. Lindsay, Senior Vice President, Director of Studies, and Maurice R. Greenberg Chair, Council on Foreign Relations
October 15, 2013 5:30-6:00 p.m. - Registration
6:00-6:45 p.m. - Meeting
6:45-7:15 p.m. - Reception and Book Signing

This meeting is on the record.

ListenWatch

Media Conference Call

Daniel Markey and Cameron Munter

Speaker:

Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations



Presider:

Anya Schmemann, Director, Editorial Strategy, Studies Program, Council on Foreign Relations
May 15, 2013

This meeting is on the record.

Listen

Media Conference Call

Ryan Crocker and Daniel Markey on Pakistani Elections

Speakers:

Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations, Ryan Crocker, Former U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan

Presider:

Anya Schmemann, Director, Editorial Strategy, Studies Program Director, Task Force Program, Council on Foreign Relations
April 1, 2013

This meeting is on the record.

Listen

General Meeting ⁄ Washington

U.S.-Pakistan Relations: The Year Past, The Year Ahead

Speakers:

Steve Coll, President and CEO, New America Foundation, Robert Grenier, Chairman, ERG Partners, Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations

Presider:

Tom Gjelten, National Security Correspondent, NPR
February 2, 2012 6:00-6:30 p.m. - Dinner Reception
6:30-7:30 p.m. - Meeting

This meeting is on the record.

ListenWatch

General Meeting ⁄ New York

U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan: Report of a CFR-Sponsored Independent Task Force

Panelists:

James Dobbins, Director, International Security and Defense Policy Center, National Security Research Division, RAND Corporation; Member, Independent Task Force on U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan, Robert Grenier, Chairman, ERG Partners; Member, Independent Task Force on U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan, Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations; Director, Independent Task Force on U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan

Presider:

Leslie H. Gelb, President Emeritus, Council on Foreign Relations

Introductory Speaker:

Anya Schmemann, Director, Task Force Program, Council on Foreign Relations
December 16, 2010 12:30-1:00 p.m. - Lunch
1:00 p.m.-2:00 a.m. - Meeting

This meeting is on the record.

ListenWatch

Guest Event ⁄ Washington

U.S. Strategy for Pakistan and Afghanistan: Report of a CFR-Sponsored Independent Task Force

Speakers:

Richard L. Armitage, President, Armitage International; Former Deputy Secretary of State; Task Force Co-Chair, Samuel R. Berger, Chair, Albright Stonebridge Group; Former National Security Adviser; Task Force Co-Chair, Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia Studies, Council on Foreign Relations; Task Force Project Director

Presider:

David R. Ignatius, Columnist and Associate Editor, "Washington Post"
November 12, 2010 8:00-8:30 a.m. - Breakfast Reception and Registration
8:30-9:30 a.m. - Meeting

This meeting is on the record.

ListenWatch

Academic Conference Call

India-Pakistan Relations

Speakers:

Evan A. Feigenbaum, Senior Fellow for East, Central, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations, Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations

Presider:

Irina A. Faskianos, Vice President, National Program & Outreach, Council on Foreign Relations
January 27, 2010

This meeting is not for attribution.

Listen

Conference Panel Session

Afghanistan, Pakistan, and U.S. National Security: The Current State of Play

Speakers:

Lisa Curtis, Senior Research Fellow, Asian Studies Center, The Heritage Foundation, Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations, Ronald E. Neumann, President, American Academy of Diplomacy

Presider:

Karen J. DeYoung, Senior Diplomatic Correspondent and Associate Editor, The Washington Post
April 21, 2009

This meeting is not for attribution.

ListenWatch

General Meeting

The President's Inbox: The Greater Middle East

Speakers:

Stephen D. Biddle, Senior Fellow for Defense Policy, Council on Foreign Relations, Steven A. Cook, Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, Council on Foreign Relations, Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations

Presider:

Gary Samore, Vice President, Director of Studies, and Maurice R. Greenberg Chair, Council on Foreign Relations
January 23, 2009 12:00-12:30 p.m. - Lunch Reception
12:30-1:30 p.m. - Meeting

This meeting is on the record.

ListenWatch

Conference Panel Session

Center for Preventive Action Symposium on Preventive Priorities for a New Era, Session Two: Outlook for Critical Regions

Speakers:

Steven A. Cook, Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, Council on Foreign Relations, Michelle D. Gavin, Adjunct Fellow for Africa, Council on Foreign Relations, Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations

Presider:

Jane Holl Lute, Assistant Secretary-General for Peacebuilding Support, United Nations
December 9, 2008

This meeting is not for attribution.

ListenWatch

General Meeting ⁄ Washington

Continuing Challenges for U.S. Foreign Policy: Pakistan

Speakers:

Robert Grenier, Managing Director, Kroll, Former Director, CIA Counterterrorism Center, Daniel S. Markey, Senior Fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia, Council on Foreign Relations, Nicholas Schmidle, Fellow, Institute of Current World Affairs

Presider:

Jonah Blank, Chief Majority Policy Adviser for South Asia, Senate Committee on Foreign Relations
February 26, 2008 8:00-8:30 a.m. - Breakfast Reception
8:30-9:30 a.m. - Meeting

This meeting is on the record.

Listen

Press/Panels

Video Interview

The Nixon Test

Back in the summer of 2011, the editor of Foreign Affairs journal, Gideon Rose, suggested in the pages of The New York Times that the Obama administration draws lessons from the experience of the Vietnam War and implements a "Neo-Nixonian" strategy in Afghanistan.

Listen