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Mira Rapp-Hooper

Stanton Nuclear Security Fellow

All Publications

Article

Securing Sovereignty: When Should America Weigh In?

Author: Mira Rapp-Hooper
The National Interest

In mid-February, the United States government's long-standing position that it does not opine on sovereignty disputes in the East and South China Seas was given an important and long-implicit caveat: Washington does insist that all sovereignty claims accord with international law, and as has long been stated, these cannot rely on coercion.

See more in United States; Treaties and Agreements; Military Operations

Ask CFR Experts

How does the nuclear deal with Iran affect Hezbollah and its regional influence?

Asked by Ahmad Takouche
Author: Mira Rapp-Hooper

It is not clear how the interim Geneva agreement between Iran and the P5+1 powers will affect Iran's relationship with Lebanon-based Hezbollah or Hezbollah's regional influence. According to the IAEA's most recent report, Iran's stockpile of medium-enriched uranium has decreased substantially from its prior levels, suggesting that Iran is implementing the Geneva agreement, at least for the time being. One could certainly argue that if Iran continues to comply with the deal and forecloses its nuclear option, it will no longer be able to easily project influence with the threat of nuclear weapons acquisition or a latent nuclear capability. By this logic, Iran may choose to rely more heavily on Hezbollah to make its presence felt throughout the region. This is certainly a concern of other Gulf States, who fear that the nuclear deal does not address the threat that proxy groups may pose to their regimes.

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See more in Iran; Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation; Political Movements and Protests

Article

Extended Deterrence, Assurance, and Reassurance in the Pacific during the Second Nuclear Age

Authors: Mira Rapp-Hooper and Linton F. Brooks
National Bureau of Asian Research

Mira Rapp-Hooper and Linton Brooks analyze the complex relationships that exist around the extended deterrence of China and North Korea, including assuring U.S. allies in Asia of the reliability of U.S. security guarantees, and reassuring China that the US does not seek to thwart its peaceful rise.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation

Bio

Mira Rapp-Hooper is a PhD candidate in political science at Columbia University. Her dissertation analyzes the formation and management of nuclear security guarantees.

Ms. Rapp-Hooper has previously worked on extended deterrence and conflict escalation issues for the RAND Corporation. Her expertise includes nuclear weapons policy and strategy, alliance politics, security issues in East Asia, and nuclear nonproliferation.

Mira's work has appeared in The Atlantic, Survival, and The National Interest, among others.

She holds a BA in history from Stanford University, an MA in politics from New York University, and an MA and an MPhil from Columbia University.