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Max Boot

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies

Expertise

U.S. foreign policy; defense policy; military history; terrorism and guerrilla warfare.

Programs

National Security and Defense Program

Featured Publications

All Publications

Article

Iraq: Baghdad Without America

Author: Max Boot
Newsweek

Max Boot says that at the moment, Iraq is an uneasy mixture of good and bad, volatile and stable, healthy and diseased—a strange witches' brew that could blow up or, just possibly, turn into an elixir for the entire region.

See more in Iraq; Military Operations

Expert Roundup

Was the Iraq War Worth It?

Authors: Andrew J. Bacevich, Max Boot, Michael O'Hanlon, and Michael Ignatieff

As the U.S. military formally ends operations in Iraq, four top expert voices in the debate on the war differ over whether it merited the cost in blood, treasure, and U.S. credibility.

See more in Iraq; Wars and Warfare

Op-Ed

Assad Must Go

Author: Max Boot
Weekly Standard

Max Boot says U.S. leadership is needed to galvanize a coalition for effective action against the Assad regime in Syria.

See more in Syria; United States

Article

Losing Iraq?

Author: Max Boot
Weekly Standard

Max Boot states that an American drawdown in both Iraq and Afghanistan makes continued war—and with it the possibility of a catastrophic American defeat—more likely by emboldening our enemies and disheartening our friends.

See more in Wars and Warfare; Afghanistan; United States; Iraq

Testimony Author: Max Boot

In his testimony before the House Armed Services Committee, Max Boot argues that the impact of budget cuts has the potential to devastate our armed forces and do more damage to their fighting capacity than any other external foe.

See more in Defense Strategy; Defense Budget

Current Projects

Roundtable Series on National Security Affairs

Director: Max Boot, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies
July 2007—Present

This series focuses on issues, primarily military, that affect American national security. The series begins withan early focus on the war on Iraq, and later roundtables examine issues relating to the transformation of the American armed forces to cope with warfare in the information age.

Past Projects

Study Group on the History of Military Revolutions

Staff: Max Boot, Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow for National Security Studies
March 1, 2003—Present

This study group will result in a book that examines four major technological revolutions of the past 500 years (Gunpowder, Industrial, Mechanization, and Computerization) and how they transformed warfare and the international balance-of-power. For each military revolution, Mr. Boot will provide dramatic narratives of key conflicts--from the battle of the Spanish Armada to the recent war in Afghanistan--that highlight the effects of changing technologies on strategy. In addition, Mr. Boot applies the lessons of history to current dilemmas, examining crucial questions such as how long America's military advantage will last, and what the United States can do to preserve its hegemony.

This project has been made possible with the generous support from the following:

Smith Richardson Foundation

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

Randolph Foundation

Roger and Susan Hertog

The Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation

Carnegie Corporation

John M. Olin Foundation

 

Press/Panels

Bio

Max Boot is one of America's leading military historians and foreign-policy analysts. The Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Senior Fellow in National Security Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, Boot is also a contributing editor to the Weekly Standard and the Los Angeles Times, and a regular contributor to the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Commentary, and other publications.

Boot's newest book, Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present, was released in January 2013 by W.W. Norton & Co./Liveright and immediately became a New York Times Bestseller. It was acclaimed as "enormous, brilliant, and important" (Michael Korda, the Daily Beast) and "thoughtful, smart, fluent, with an eye for the good story" (Michael Mazower, New York Times Book Review, front page). John Nagl wrote in the Wall Street Journal that "Mr. Boot's impressive work of military history is destined to be the classic account of what may be the oldest as well as the hardest form of war."

His previous book, War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History, 1500 to Today (Gotham Books, 2006), has been hailed as a "magisterial survey of technology and war" by the New York Times and "brilliantly crafted history" by the Wall Street Journal.

Boot's first book of military history, The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power (Basic Books) was selected as one of the best books of 2002 by numerous newspapers, won the 2003 General Wallace M. Greene Jr. Award from the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation as the best nonfiction book pertaining to Marine Corps history, and has been placed on Army, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy professional reading lists. More than 100,000 copies of his books are in print.

Boot has served as an adviser to U.S. commanders in Iraq and Afghanistan. He was also a senior foreign policy adviser to John McCain's presidential campaign in 2007–2008 and a defense policy adviser to Mitt Romney's campaign in 2011–2012.

Boot is a frequent public speaker and guest on radio and television news programs, both at home and abroad. He has lectured on behalf of the U.S. State Department and at many military institutions, including the Army, Navy, and Air War Colleges, the Australian Defense College, the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare School, and West Point.

In 2004, he was named by the World Affairs Councils of America as one of "the 500 most influential people in the United States in the field of foreign policy." In 2007, he won the Eric Breindel Award for Excellence in Opinion Journalism, given annually to a writer who exhibits "love of country and its democratic institutions" and "bears witness to the evils of totalitarianism."

Before joining the Council in 2002, Boot spent eight years as a writer and editor at the Wall Street Journal, the last five years as op-ed editor. From 1992 to 1994 he was an editor and writer at the Christian Science Monitor.

Boot holds a bachelor's degree in history, with high honors, from the University of California, Berkeley (1991), and a master's degree in history from Yale University (1992). He was born in Russia, grew up in Los Angeles, and now lives in the New York area. He has three children: Victoria, Abigail, and William.