Transition 2012Transition 2012

Resources on the foreign policy dimensions of the presidential transition

Video

PrintPrint EmailEmail ShareShare CiteCite
Style:MLAAPAChicagoClose

loading...

Video Brief: Foreign Aid

Speaker: Isobel Coleman, Senior Fellow and Director of the Civil Society, Markets, and Democracy Initiative; Director of the Women and Foreign Policy Program, Council on Foreign Relations
April 6, 2012

Whoever is in the White House in 2013 will have to retain the relevancy of U.S. foreign aid programs in an environment where the role of official foreign assistance from governments has dramatically reduced, says Isobel Coleman, director of CFR's Civil Societies, Markets, and Democracy Initiative.

The next administration will likely continue to shift aid resources away from Iraq and Afghanistan, and away from middle-income countries towards poorer countries, Coleman says.

The United States will also seek opportunities to collaborate with the private sector and other countries' foreign aid programs to maximize the impact of foreign assistance efforts, she says.

This video is part of Campaign 2012, a series of video briefings on the top foreign policy issues debated in the run-up to the 2012 elections.


Terms of Use: I understand that I may access this audio and/or video file solely for my personal use. Any other use of the file and its content, including display, distribution, reproduction, or alteration in any form for any purpose, whether commercial, noncommercial, educational, or promotional, is expressly prohibited without the written permission of the copyright owner, the Council on Foreign Relations. For more information, write publications@cfr.org.

More on This Topic

Op-Ed

Why McCain Endures

Author: Michael J. Gerson
Washington Post

“Mccain’s foreign policy idealism has been reaffirmed not because it is wildly popular but because it is unavoidable,” argues Michael J....