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Ryan’s Proposal Would Shrink Medicare’s Doctor Pool

Author: Peter R. Orszag, Adjunct Senior Fellow
September 19, 2012
Bloomberg.com

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The federal budget proposed by Representative Paul Ryan, the Republican vice-presidential nominee, extols the benefits of "promoting true choice" for Medicare beneficiaries. In truth, though, the Ryan plan would substantially reduce choice for many people on Medicare -- by cutting them off from their current doctors.

Doctors see Medicare patients, despite the relatively low payments they receive for doing so, partly because Medicare represents such a large share of the health-care market. If a substantial number of beneficiaries moved out of Medicare and into private plans, as Ryan proposes, doctors would have much less incentive to see Medicare patients. And the elderly who want to remain in traditional Medicare would risk being stranded.

The evidence suggests that, in time, this problem could well affect a large share of Medicare beneficiaries. To put that evidence in context, though, it helps to first review the history of the Ryan plan.

The proposal has changed since it was presented in 2011. In the original version, traditional Medicare was eventually to be replaced in its entirety by private plans. The Congressional Budget Office found that this shift would raise health-care costs drastically because the private plans wouldn't be large enough to enjoy Medicare's leverage in negotiating prices with hospitals and other large providers. The savings that private plans could achieve because beneficiaries would share more of the costs, and therefore economize more, would be more than offset by that loss of leverage -- and by the private plans' higher overhead and need to turn a profit.

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