Surprise Attack Reconsidered

Speakers:
Ernest R. May Charles Warren Professor of History, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University; Co-Author, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-Makers
Wm. Roger Louis Director, National History Center; Past President, American Historical Association
Description

In this first meeting of a series organized in collaboration with the National History Center, historian Ernie May will discuss some of history’s most infamous surprise attacks, including the fall of France in World War II, the attack on Pearl Harbor, and the September 11 terrorist attacks. From a historical perspective, he will reflect on their impact on U.S. foreign policy and the lessons we have learned from them.

Audio
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