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The NATO Panic

Author: Fred Kaplan
March 28, 2014
Slate

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Granted, the crisis in Ukraine is worrisome, Vladimir Putin's behavior is unpredictable, and the 30,000 Russian troops amassed on the Ukrainian border arouse a sense of dread and danger unfelt since the Cold War. That said, the alarmism is getting out of hand. Legitimate concerns are spiraling into war chants and trembling, a weird mix of paranoia and nostalgia, needlessly inflating tensions and severely distorting the true picture.

A bizarre example of this is a March 26New York Times story headlined "Military Cuts Render NATO Less Formidable as Deterrent to Russia." The normally seasoned reporters, Helene Cooper and Steven Erlanger, note that the United States "has drastically cut back its European forces from a decade ago." For instance, during "the height of the Cold War" (which was actually three decades ago, but let that pass), we had about 400,000 combat-ready forces defending Western Europe—whereas now we have about 67,000. In terms of manpower, weapons, and other military equipment, they write, "the American military presence" in Europe is "85 percent smaller than it was in 1989."

Yet the article contains not one word about the decline of Russia's "military presence" in Europe since that time. It only takes one word to sum up that topic: disappeared. The once-mighty Warsaw Pact—the Russian-led alliance that faced NATO troops along the East-West German border—is no more. And its erstwhile frontline nations—East Germany, Czechoslovakia, and Poland—have been absorbed into the West, indeed into NATO. This is hardly an esoteric fact, yet its omission makes the Times' trend lines seem much scarier than they really are.


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