Axis of Anxiety: U.S. Options on Iran

Speakers:
Kenneth M. Pollack Senior Fellow and Director of Research, Saban Center for Middle East Policy, The Brookings Institution
Ray Takeyh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, Council on Foreign Relations; Author, "Hidden Iran: Paradox and Power in the Islamic Republic"
Presider:
Barbara Slavin Senior Diplomatic Reporter, USA Today
Description

“Getting Iran wrong is the single thread that has linked American administrations of all political persuasions,” writes Council Senior Fellow Ray Takeyh in his new book, Hidden Iran. Join Takeyh, Kenneth Pollack, and Barbara Slavin for an inside glimpse of the country, as well as some policy prescriptions for dealing with Iran. 

12:00 - 12:30 p.m. Lunch Reception
12:30 - 1:30 p.m Meeting

Audio
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