Iraq: After the Surge

Speakers:
Steven N. Simon Hasib J. Sabbagh Senior Fellow for Middle Eastern Studies, Council on Foreign Relations; Author, After the Surge: The Case for U.S. Military Disengagement from Iraq
Walter B. Slocombe Caplin & Drysdale, Chartered
Ellen Laipson President & CEO, Henry L. Stimson Center
Description

On the cusp of the 4th anniversary of the Iraq war, the implications of the troop surge for the future of Iraq are yet unclear. In the Council Special Report “After the Surge: The Case for U.S. Military Disengagement from Iraq,” Steven Simon argues that a continued U.S. presence is detrimental to U.S. interests, as there is nothing left to gain but much to lose. Join Mr. Simon and Walter Slocombe for a discussion on the future of U.S. policy in Iraq.

To view the report, click here.

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