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Op-Ed

The Worst and the Dimmest

Author: Max Boot
ForeignPolicy.com

The U.S. under President Donald Trump does not actually seem to have a foreign policy. To be exact, it has several foreign policies — and it is not obvious whether anyone, including the president himself, speaks for the entire administration.

See more in United States; Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

The Drip Drip Drip of Kremlingate

Author: Max Boot
USA Today

It is perhaps too much to hope for, but it would be a pleasant surprise if Republicans treated Kremlingate as seriously as they treated the issue of Clinton’s email server or the Benghazi attack. There is a desperate need for a credible, bipartisan investigation to get to the bottom of this murky business, and the president should welcome such an inquiry if he has nothing to hide.

See more in Russian Federation; Intelligence; Presidents and Chiefs of State

Op-Ed

A Big Deal?

Author: Elliott Abrams
Weekly Standard

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's visit to Washington demonstrated that the tensions in U.S.-Israeli relations during the Obama administration are over and that the Trump administration intends to pursue a peace process.

See more in Israel; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Op-Ed

Sorry, Trump, but America’s Economy Is Already Pretty Great

Author: Sebastian Mallaby
The Washington Post

President Trump asserts that the U.S. economy is a disaster and that he alone can fix it. The truth is that the U.S. economy is doing better than most Americans realize, and activist attempts to fix what ain’t broke are one of the gravest threats to it. What’s at stake is not simply that the president is vague or wrong about the facts. It’s that bad facts make for bad policy.

See more in United States; Economics

Article

Trump May Threaten a Trade War Over NAFTA, but His Options Are Limited

Author: Edward Alden
World Politics Review

When then-President Bill Clinton signed the North American Free Trade Agreement in a White House ceremony in December 1993, he called it “a defining moment” for the United States and praised Mexico and Canada as “our partners in the future that we are trying to make together.” All three countries had made what then seemed like an irreversible decision to marry their economic futures. Yet today, less than a quarter-century later, those bonds are badly fraying.

See more in Americas; Trade