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News Release

U.S. Should Increase Its Strategic Commitment to the Arctic, Says CFR Task Force

“The United States, through Alaska, is a significant Arctic nation with strategic, economic, and scientific interests,” asserts a new Council on Foreign Relations-sponsored (CFR) Independent Task Force report, Arctic Imperatives: Reinforcing U.S. Strategy on America’s Fourth Coast. With the Arctic “warming at twice the rate as the rest of the planet” and melting sea ice opening up this resource-rich region to new trade routes and commercial activities, the report stresses that “the United States needs to increase its strategic commitment to the region or risk leaving its interests unprotected.”

See more in Arctic; Climate Change

Article

Tillerson Bumbles Around Asia

Author: Ely Ratner
Politico

The Trump team’s early forays into Asia couldn’t have gone better. In early February, Defense Secretary James Mattis received high praise for his trip to Tokyo and Seoul, reassuring nervous allies that the Trump administration would continue decades of American leadership in Asia. A week later, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe braved a visit to the White House and was rewarded with President Donald Trump reaffirming the importance of the U.S.-Japan alliance.

See more in China; United States; Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

Five Myths About Turkey

Author: Steven A. Cook
Washington Post

There remain many misconceptions about modern Turkey among Americans, writes CFR’s Steven A. Cook. The country is not a democracy, its president is not a dictator, many state institutions are not secular, it does not have a Kurdish problem, and it is the product of Mustafa Kemal Ataturk’s modernist vision of Anatolian society.

See more in Turkey; Politics and Strategy

Other Report

Global Economics Monthly March 2017

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn writes that Greece and its creditors are again locked in a showdown over reforms, cash, and debt relief. Another cliff-hanger ahead of heavy July debt payments looks likely. Extend-and-pretend is a dead end for Greece and an increasingly populist Europe, and a more ambitious agreement seems ruled out by bailout fatigue in creditor countries. Markets are once again underestimating the risks of “Grexit.”

See more in Europe; Economics