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Russian President Putin's Remarks on Treaty with Crimea

Author: Vladimir Putin

Russian President Vladimir Putin gave these remarks before the Russian parliament, stating that Crimea could become a part of Russia. After the speech, Russian and Crimean officials signed a treaty to unify the two regions. The United Nations passed a resolution on March 27, 2014, on Ukraine's territory.

See more in Russian Federation; Ukraine; Ethnicity, Minorities, and National Identity; Sovereignty

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Los Angeles Times: In Ukraine, the Jobless and Aimless Replace the Revolutionaries

Author: Carol J. Williams

"Russia's moves on Crimea, where its Black Sea fleet is based on territory leased from Ukraine, has diverted the international spotlight from Maidan. And the shift of battle lines from Kiev to Simferopol, Crimea's regional capital, has raised further questions about why and whether the revolutionary stragglers at Maidan are serving any useful purpose."

See more in Ukraine; Defense and Security

Transcript

Fracking Revolution Transforming the Global Energy Landscape

Speakers: Admiral Dennis Blair, John Browne, and Robert D. Blackwill

Admiral Dennis Blair, BP Officer, John Browne, and CFR Fellow, Robert D. Blackwill discuss the American energy boom and its concerns with both gas and oil. According to the following experts, through the use of fracking, the United States has increased its oil production to approximately 3.5 million barrels per day, in the last five years.

See more in Global; Energy and Environment

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Washington Institute: The Assad Regime Winning by Inches?

Author: Jeffrey White

"The regime's political goals are to remain in power, restore its control over as much of Syria as it can, and render the political opposition an irrelevant exile movement. Its military goal is to reduce the armed opposition to a manageable terrorist threat. This does not imply that the opposition has to be completely eliminated or that every inch of lost ground has to be recovered. Yet the regime has never shown any intention other than to fight, and it fights essentially everywhere in Syria."

See more in Syria; Conflict Assessment

Article

With Lack of Major Breakthroughs in U.S.-China Relations, the Small Things Matter

Author: Elizabeth C. Economy
World Politics Review

The current state of U.S.-China relations would appear to be in disarray—a number of high-profile efforts at cooperation have fallen short, and domestic politics in both countries offer little reason for hope. But even though there have not been any major breakthroughs, small accomplishments can nonetheless be significant, says Elizabeth Economy, building a strong foundation to the bilateral relationship.

See more in China; Diplomacy and Statecraft

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Majalla: Iran's Fourth Estate

Author: Arash Karami

"The state of the Iranian media can serve as a bellwether for understanding where the country is headed. In the past, the restrictions under which Iranian journalists had to operate fluctuated as the political fortunes of conservatives and reformists shifted."

See more in Iran; Censorship and Freedom of Speech

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Carnegie Europe: Foundations of German Power

Author: Ulrich Speck

"Without a strong and assertive Germany, there can be no strong and assertive EU in the world. And without a more self-confident EU, the liberal global order―built and underpinned for decades by the United States―might not be sustainable. Germany must start to invest more in an order from which it has benefited so much over the decades."

See more in Germany; Business and Foreign Policy

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Congressional Research Service: Russian Political, Economic, and Security Issues and U.S. Interests

"Although Russia may not be as central to U.S. interests as was the Soviet Union, cooperation between the two is essential in many areas. Russia remains a nuclear superpower. It still has a major impact on U.S. national security interests in Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. Russia has an important role in the future of arms control, the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), and the fight against terrorism."

See more in Russian Federation; United States; Defense and Security

Op-Ed

Israel Gets No Credit From Obama for a Year of Moderate Settlement Construction

Authors: Elliott Abrams and Uri Sadot
Washington Post

President Obama recently complained about "aggressive" settlement construction by Israel, but the facts are otherwise. The new statistics show that Israel is building energetically in Jerusalem and in the blocs it will obviously keep, and slowing construction in smaller settlements beyond its security barrier in areas that may someday be part of a Palestinian state. Elliott Abrams and Uri Sadot explain.

See more in Israel; Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights