Aging

Must Read

Financial Times: The Ghost at Chinaís Third Plenum: Demographics

Author: David Pilling

"It is hard to overstate how fast China is ageing. Life expectancy has more than doubled from 35 in 1949 to 75 today, a miraculous achievement. Meanwhile, the fertility rate has plummeted to 1.5 or lower, far below the 2.1 needed to keep a population stable. Cai Fang, a demographer at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, says the country will have moved from labour surplus to labour shortage at the fastest pace in history."

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Must Read

Wall Street Journal: Aging Population Could Trim 3% Off China GDP Growth

Author: Bob Davis

"The share of the working-age population (ages 15-64) will decline in China between 2010 and 2030 nearly as fast as it will in Japan, the U.S. and other wealthy nations. Switching to a two-child policy could even make things worse over the next 20 year, because more births would mean that working parents would have more dependents to care for, the economists note."

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Op-Ed

Retirement Will Kill You

Author: Peter R. Orszag
Bloomberg.com

Peter Orszag explains that employment, in and of itself, may provide health benefits in the form of decreased rates of depression, increased mobility, and improved life expectancy as compared to those who are unemployed or retired.

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Op-Ed

The Health Time Bomb That Could Cost Us Billions

Author: Michael W. Hodin
The Fiscal Times

Michael W. Hodin says the global forecast for Alzheimer's is not good, arguing, "If we don't make significant strides in prevention, treatment and cures, Alzheimer's will turn the miracle of longevity into a society-wide curse."

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Op-Ed

Women, Aging, and Economic Growth

Author: Michael W. Hodin
Huffington Post

Michael W. Hodin argues that President Obama missed an opportunity at the G20 meeting to show the world how the lessons from America's women's movement can solve the world's growing economic woes.

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Op-Ed

Outsourcing Aging?

Author: Michael W. Hodin
Huffington Post

Michael W. Hodin argues that Hollywood's recent attention to retirement, even if lighthearted, is a confrontation of the subject of population aging, the most profound transformation of our time.

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Op-Ed

2012 Graduates: You'll Live Long, Now Prosper

Author: Michael W. Hodin
Huffington Post

Michael W. Hodin says today's graduates are facing an unprecedented era of aging populations that will force them to rethink what it means to age and reinvent education so it becomes a lifelong pursuit.


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Op-Ed

21st Century Tax Policy and Aging Populations

Author: Michael W. Hodin
Huffington Post

Michael W. Hodin says that as more Americans will be over sixty in the 21st century, tax and spend policies will have to shift profoundly if the United States is to avoid burdensome, confiscatory rates on those in the traditional working population.

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Transcript

Aging Americans: Challenges and Innovations for Foreign Policy and the Private Sector

Speakers: Michael W. Hodin, Robert D. Hormats, and Jane E. Shaw
Presider: Susan Dentzer

The World Health Organization has deemed "Aging and Health" the theme of this year's World Health Day, observed on April 4, recognizing its importance as a global issue. As the United States moves toward a new demographic landscape—by 2020 the number of Americans older than the traditional retirement age will have grown considerably—policy implications and innovation are likely to follow at home and abroad. Please join Michael Hodin, Robert Hormats, and Jane Shaw to discuss what is in store for a rapidly graying United States with a focus on the public and private sectors.

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Transcript

The U.S. Aging Population as an Economic Growth Driver for Global Competitiveness

Speakers: Joseph F. Coughlin and Kelly Michel
Presider: Michael W. Hodin

Joseph Coughlin and Kelly Michel discuss how a healthy and active aging population can contribute to economic growth, and the public policy reform, new business strategies, and profound shifts in views on aging necessary to take advantage of this opportunity.

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