Climate Change

Primary Sources

U.S.-China Joint Announcement on Climate Change

U.S. President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping met on the sidelines of the 2014 meeting of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and released a climate change agreement on November 11, 2014. The agreement includes each country's goals for cutting carbon emissions. In 2013, the two countries also signed an agreement to reducing hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), emissions that deplete ozone layers.

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Issue Packages

Climate Change

These four resources will provide an overview of the scientific mechanisms underpinning climate change, provide information about how change will be felt in the United States, and describe some of the policies that could mitigate future changes to the climate.

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Department of Defense: Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap, 2014

The 2014 Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap details how climate change affects the Department of Defense's operations, how the department will adapt to and mitigate climate change threats, and how the department will coordinate with other entities addressing climate change. The Department of Defense first listed climate change as a threat to national security in its 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review.

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Op-Ed

Environmental Policies

Author: Julia E. Sweig
Folha de Sao Paulo

On the heels of the EPA's announcement of new carbon emission rules, Julia Sweig reflects in her column on the need for leadership from major economies to tackle climate change and on the prospects for cooperation between the United States and Brazil.

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Global Change Research Act

The Global Change Research Act was mandated by Congress in 1990 to develop and coordinate "a comprehensive and integrated United States research program which will assist the Nation and the world to understand, assess, predict, and respond to human-induced and natural processes of global change." Every four years, the National Climate Assessment (also called Climate Change Impacts in the United States) reports scientific consensus on how climate change affects the United States, produced by experts from U.S. government science agencies and from several major universities and research institutes.

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