Courts and Tribunals

Council Special Report No. 55

From Rome to Kampala

Author: Vijay Padmanabhan

The controversial relationship between the United States and the International Criminal Court (ICC) is at a crossroads: After an initial period of hostility toward the ICC, the United States has in recent years pursued a policy of cautious engagement. Vijay Padmanabhan offers a backdrop of the U.S.-ICC relationship and policy recommendations for the U.S. delegation attending the Seven-Year Review Conference in May/June 2010.

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Event

The Synthesis of Law and Politics and the Evolution of International Justice

Ambassador David Scheffer and former State Department legal adviser John Bellinger will discuss how international justice over the last two decades has affected international politics, including the U.S. role in assisting local war crimes prosecutions in Libya and elsewhere.

Related readings:
Regime Trials Belong in Libya's Courts by John B. Bellinger III
Partners in Preventive Action: The United States and International Institutions, A Council Special Report

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Event

Pursuing International Justice: A Conversation with Luis Moreno-Ocampo

Recently, ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo expressed plans to investigate alleged crimes against humanity during post-election violence in Kenya, and is considering an investigation of alleged war crimes during the 2008 Gaza War. To date, situations in Uganda, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, and Darfur have been referred to the ICC. Please join Luis Moreno-Ocampo to discuss these issues, case selection, and the foreign policy implications of the ICC’s work.

 

 

See more in International Organizations and Alliances; Human Rights; Courts and Tribunals

Interactive

Timeline: Leaders Facing Justice

Author: Brianna Lee

Since 1945, many leaders have been brought before courts to answer to charges including genocide, corruption, and crimes against humanty in an effort to promote and enfore the rule of law. This timeline highlights some of these trials.

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Interview

Feldman: Guantanamo Detainees May be Difficult to Try, Depending on Hamdan Ruling

Noah Feldman interviewed by Carin Zissis

CFR Adjunct Fellow Noah Feldman, discussing the legal issues at stake in the upcoming Hamdan decision, says the case will decide whether military tribunals are constitutionally sufficient and warns that if the Supreme Court rules current trial procedures inadequate, it may be difficult to try many of the nearly 500 Guantanamo detainees.

See more in Courts and Tribunals; Terrorism and the Law; United States