Cybersecurity

Op-Ed

How Silicon Valley and Washington Can Be Friends Again

Authors: Alexandre Grigsby and Adam Segal
Fortune.com

Over the course of the next four years, President Donald Trump’s administration will likely have to contend with Russian influence operations, Chinese cyber espionage, Iranian subterfuge, fights over appropriate use of encryption, data localization, and attracting technical talent to protect U.S. networks. Successfully meeting these challenges will require policy changes and deft maneuvering, write CFR's Alex Grigsby and Adam Segal.

See more in United States; Cybersecurity; Defense Technology

News Release

Washington Must Rebuild Trust With Silicon Valley to Meet Cyber Threats, Argues Segal in New Report

Cyber threats are escalating in sophistication and magnitude, but mistrust between Washington and Silicon Valley continues to stymie progress on cybersecurity. In a new Council Special Report, Adam Segal examines the security risks exacerbated by the divide between government and the technology community and offers policy recommendations to help restore trust.

See more in United States; Russia and Central Asia; Cybersecurity; Business and Foreign Policy

Article

Why Trump Should Support a Probe Into Russia’s Hacking

Author: Robert K. Knake
Politico

As reports increasingly indicate that Russia interfered with the U.S. presidential election to benefit Donald Trump, the president-elect has forcefully pushed back on the intelligence community. Admitting that Moscow played a role in the election, Trump believes, would delegitimize his victory, so he has doubled down on his position that Russia was not involved in the hacks on Democratic Party officials, writes Robert Knake. 

See more in United States; Russian Federation; Cybersecurity

Article

Spotlight on Cyber VI: Respecting the Digital Rubicon: How the DoD Should Defend The U.S. Homeland

Author: Robert K. Knake
Georgetown Journal of International Affairs

Rob Knake argues that the DoD must coordinate its role with the civilian agencies responsible for domestic security, not replace them. Its job is to conduct operations in cyberspace to blunt threats to the United States when network defenses are overwhelmed, not to operate those defenses. To do so would take our military service across the Digital Rubicon.

See more in United States; Cybersecurity; Defense Technology

Article

How The Next U.S. President Can Contain China In Cyberspace

Authors: Robert K. Knake and Adam Segal
Journal of International Affairs

When transition planning gets underway in earnest this fall, one of the hardest memos to write will be the outbrief from the current National Security Council (NSC) team on what to do about China’s ongoing campaign of cyber espionage targeting the intellectual property of U.S. companies. While long a focus of both the president’s cyber and China teams, there is little chance that in the coming months the issue is going to be brought to any type of resolution. Instead, the next president will inherit a partially implemented plan that has produced positive results in the short term, but its long-term sustainability remains uncertain. He or she would be wise to follow the playbook left by the Obama administration, with a redoubled focus on the investigation and prosecution of cybercrime.

See more in United States; Cybersecurity; China