Defense and Security

Teaching Module

Teaching Module: Invisible Armies

This module contains Teaching Notes by CFR Senior Fellow Max Boot with discussion questions, essay questions, activities, and additional materials for educators to supplement the use of Boot's book Invisible Armies in the classroom. In this book, Boot offers a comprehensive history of guerrilla warfare and terrorism, and relates lessons of the past to current national security policy considerations.

See more in Middle East and North Africa; Europe; Defense and Security; Terrorism

Primary Sources

Assistant Secretary Russel's Congressional Testimony on Maritime Disputes in East Asia

Assistant Secretary of East Asian and Pacific Affairs Daniel Russel testified before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific on February 5, 2014. He discussed tensions in East Asia sea, China's announcement of its Air Defense Identification Zone, and U.S. role in maintaining relations.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Territorial Disputes; Oceans

Ask CFR Experts

If there are no U.S. or NATO troops in Afghanistan after 2014, what happens?

Asked by Tom Gordon

There are good reasons to worry about a precipitous departure of U.S. and NATO troops from Afghanistan. The country remains fragile and the Taliban still threaten key areas. Withdrawing all troops would leave the Afghans to fend for themselves against a resurgent Taliban. And because the United States uses its presence to monitor and target al-Qaeda and other threats, such as the proliferation of nuclear weapons from the region, leaving the country completely would mean having less warning or ability to respond.

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See more in Afghanistan; Defense and Security

Op-Ed

They Who Must Not Be Named

Author: Micah Zenko
ForeignPolicy.com

The annual worldwide threat briefings of the intelligence community began with Director of National Intelligence James Clapper's briefing to the U.S. Senate, during which he discussed the top threats facing the United States in 2014. In his article, Micah Zenko discusses the one thing that will remain shrouded from the American public—exactly who the United States is at war with.

See more in Global; Intelligence; Terrorism

Primary Sources

Air Force Technical Director Fuell's Congressional Testimony: "Broad Trends in Chinese Air Force and Missile Modernization"

Lee Fuell, technical director for force modernization & employment at the National Air & Space Intelligence Center, testified on January 30, 2014, at a hearing on China's Military Modernization and its Implications for the United States before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission.

See more in China; Missile Defense; Global Future Trends

Primary Sources

Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community

Annually, the Director of National Intelligence testifies before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence and before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence to discuss the current and potential threats to United States' security and priorities for the Department of Defense budget. The assessment usually covers terrorism threats, cyber attacks, counterintelligence, proliferation, mass atrocities, regional and country-by-country threats, and other state and non state intelligence threats such as health threats, water security and transnational crime.

See more in United States; Cybersecurity; Intelligence

Op-Ed

The True Forever War

Author: Micah Zenko
ForeignPolicy.com

Advanced technologies have altered the relevancy of the 2001 Authorization for the Use of Military Force (AUMF), however a repeal of the AUMF is unlikely, argues Micah Zenko. "These technologies greatly change the calculus for civilian officials, and they have lowered the threshold for when presidents authorize the use of force."

See more in United States; Military Operations

Ask CFR Experts

How will the withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan affect U.S.-Pakistan relations?

Asked by Ahner Abdullah

Many Pakistanis are inclined to view 2014 as the beginning of a new U.S. abandonment of Pakistan. This perspective is inspired both by a long history of ups (1950s, 1980s, early 2000s) and downs (1960s, most of the 1970s, and 1990s) in the relationship between Washington and Islamabad, as well as by the coming military drawdown from Afghanistan.

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See more in Asia and Pacific; United States; Defense and Security