Defense and Security

Article

China-Korea Relations: New Sanctions, Old Dilemmas

Authors: Scott A. Snyder and See-won Byun
Comparative Connections

North Korea’s fourth nuclear test in January and long-range rocket launch in February drew global opposition in the form of UN Security Council (UNSC) resolution 2270 and condemnation by regional leaders. Pyongyang promptly dismissed such calls with a series of short- and mid-range missile launches in March and April. 

See more in China; North Korea; Sanctions; Regional Security

Article

Government's Role in Vulnerability Disclosure: Creating a Permanent and Accountable Vulnerability Equities Process

Authors: Ari Schwartz and Robert K. Knake
Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs John F. Kennedy School of Government Harvard University

In this June 2016 discussion paper, Knake and his coauthor examine the Obama administration’s Vulnerability Equities Process guidelines. They argue that the administration ought to formalize and publicize these guidelines and offer policy recommendations to improve the VEP while maintaining a bias toward public disclosure of zero day vulnerabilities.

See more in Global; Cybersecurity

Article

Why Donald Trump's Plan for Japan Would Be a Nightmare for Asia

Author: Sheila A. Smith
Vox

Republican Party’s Presumptive Nominee for President Donald Trump stated that he would consider ending the U.S. commitment to Japan’s defense and encouraging it to develop its own nuclear arsenal. Sheila A. Smith, senior fellow for Japan studies, argues that such an act would not only be a nightmare scenario for Japan, but would profoundly alter the strategic dynamics that have maintained peace in the Asia-Pacific for generations

See more in Asia and Pacific; Elections; Regional Security

Interactive

Sub-Saharan Security Tracker

The Sub-Saharan Security Tracker (SST) draws on data from the Armed Conflict Location and Event Data (ACLED) Project, which documents political conflict across Africa. ACLED collects and codes reports of political violence from the media as well as local and international organizations.

See more in Africa (sub-Saharan); Defense and Security

Event

A Conversation with Michele Flournoy

Presider: Jamille Bigio
Speaker: Michèle Flournoy

From mass migration, to violent extremism, to climate change, the next U.S. administration will face daunting threats to global stability and U.S. national security interests. The nature of these challenges, coupled with the decentralization of power across the globe, will demand inclusive solutions that draw upon the knowledge, skills, and networks of diverse populations. Drawing upon National Defense University’s recent PRISM publication on women, peace, and inclusive security, Michèle Flournoy joined CFR for a discussion on why the next U.S. administration must include women and civil society in its national security strategy and policy to advance stability around the world. 

See more in Global; Defense and Security

Article

U.S.-Japan-Relations: 2016 Opens with a Bang

Authors: Sheila A. Smith and Charles McClean
Comparative Connections

Sheila A. Smith, senior fellow for Japan studies, analyzes how the United States and Japan together dealt with North Korean fourth nuclear test, China’s increasing military activities in the South China Sea, the long-standing base relocation issue in Okinawa, and the “Trump Shock,” caused by Republican frontrunner Donald Trump’s campaign language toward Japan on trade and on security cooperation.

See more in China; Japan; Regional Security

Interactive

Sub-Saharan Security Tracker

The Sub-Saharan Security Tracker (SST) draws on data from the Armed Conflict Location and Event Data (ACLED) Project, which documents political conflict across Africa. ACLED collects and codes reports of political violence from the media as well as local and international organizations.

See more in Africa (sub-Saharan); Defense and Security

News Release

U.S. Cold War Focus on Stability in the Middle East Provides Lessons for Today, Say Ray Takeyh and Steven Simon in New Book

“The underreported story of the Cold War is that the United States succeeded in achieving many of its objectives in the Middle East,” argue Ray Takeyh, senior fellow for Middle Eastern studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Steven Simon, visiting scholar at Dartmouth College. Cutting against conventional wisdom, the authors shed new light on the makings of the modern Middle East and draw lessons for U.S. strategy today.

See more in Middle East and North Africa; Russian Federation; Defense and Security; Politics and Strategy