Defense and Security

Foreign Affairs Article

Reforming the NSA

Authors: Daniel Byman and Benjamin Wittes

The long-running debate over the tradeoffs the United States should make between national security and civil liberties flared up spectacularly last summer, when Edward Snowden, a National Security Agency contractor, handed journalists a huge trove of heavily classified documents that exposed, in excruciating detail, electronic surveillance programs and other operations carried out by the NSA. Americans suddenly learned that in recent years, the NSA had been acquiring the phone and Internet communications of hundreds of thousands of U.S. citizens, as well as collecting massive volumes of bulk telephone records known as "metadata" -- phone numbers and the time and length of calls.

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Primary Sources

Remarks by Incoming SPFUSA Chairman Blair: Operational Impacts of Japan's New Security Policy and Capabilities on the U.S.-Japan Alliance

Admiral Dennis Blair spoke at Japan's New Security Policy and Capabilities: Domestic Politics, International Views and Practical Implications, a conference held April 30, 2014, at the Sasakawa Peace Foundation USA (SPFUSA). Admiral Blair was appointed SPFUSA chair on May 1, 2014.

See more in Japan; United States; Treaties and Agreements; Defense Strategy

Transcript

North Korea, Nuclear Diplomacy, and Regional Security in Northeast Asia

Speakers: Stephen W. Bosworth and Han Sung-Joo
Presider: Richard C. Bush III

Stephen Bosworth of Tufts University and Korea University's Han Sung-Joo join Richard Bush of the Center for East Asia Policy Studies to discuss the history of nuclear negotiations with North Korea and outline the potential policy options going forward.

See more in North Korea; Regional Security; Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation

Video

North Korea, Nuclear Diplomacy, and Regional Security in Northeast Asia

Speakers: Stephen W. Bosworth and Han Sung-Joo
Presider: Richard C. Bush III

Stephen Bosworth of Tufts University and Korea University's Han Sung-Joo join Richard Bush of the Center for East Asia Policy Studies to discuss the history of nuclear negotiations with North Korea and outline the potential policy options going forward.

See more in North Korea; Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation; Regional Security

Audio

North Korea, Nuclear Diplomacy, and Regional Security in Northeast Asia

Speakers: Stephen W. Bosworth and Han Sung-Joo
Presider: Richard C. Bush III

Stephen Bosworth of Tufts University and Korea University's Han Sung-Joo join Richard Bush of the Center for East Asia Policy Studies to discuss the history of nuclear negotiations with North Korea and outline the potential policy options going forward.

See more in North Korea; Arms Control, Disarmament, and Nonproliferation; Regional Security

Foreign Affairs Article

Hypocrisy Hype

Authors: Martha Finnemore and Michael Cohen

In their essay "The End of Hypocrisy" (November/December 2013), Henry Farrell and Martha Finnemore argue that the biggest threat from leakers of classified information such as Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden is that "they undermine Washington's ability to act hypocritically and get away with it."

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Foreign Affairs Article

Is Cyberwar Real?

Authors: Jarno Limnell and Thomas Rid

Thomas Rid ("Cyberwar and Peace," November/December 2013) describes cyberattacks as somehow separate from conventional warfare because they fail to meet all three of Clausewitz's definitions of war as violent, instrumental, and attributable to one side as an action taken for a political goal.

See more in United States; Cybersecurity

Video

China's Maritime Disputes

Speakers: Elizabeth C. Economy, Richard N. Haass, Shen Dingli, Sheila A. Smith, and Simon Tay

The East and South China Seas are the scene of escalating territorial disputes between China and its neighbors, including Japan, Vietnam, and the Philippines. The tensions, shaped by China's growing assertiveness, have fueled concerns over armed conflict and raised questions about Washington's security commitments in its strategic rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Defense and Security

Article

Securing Sovereignty: When Should America Weigh In?

Author: Mira Rapp-Hooper
The National Interest

In mid-February, the United States government's long-standing position that it does not opine on sovereignty disputes in the East and South China Seas was given an important and long-implicit caveat: Washington does insist that all sovereignty claims accord with international law, and as has long been stated, these cannot rely on coercion.

See more in United States; Treaties and Agreements; Military Operations

Must Read

Radiolab: 60 Words

"In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF)has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the 'war on terror.'"

See more in United States; 9/11 Impact

Article

The Power to Threaten War

Author: Matthew C. Waxman
Yale Law Journal Online

Matt Waxman shows that congressional influence operates more robustly—and in different ways—than usually supposed in legal debates about war powers to shape strategic decision-making. In turn, these mechanisms of congressional influence can enhance the potency of threatened force.

See more in United States; Wars and Warfare