Defense Technology


What's Unusual About Today's 'Dual-Use' Technologies?

Author: Samuel C. Hinote
Cicero Magazine

Whether it’s finding our way around with the help of a GPS, sending large files through e-mail, or flying across the country, we all benefit from technologies that were originally developed for military use. Our lives would be very different without inventions such as the Global Positioning System, network packeting, and the jet engine. These “dual-use” technologies have proven to be winners in both military and commercial contexts—they help us to fight better and live better. As we look to the future, we will undoubtedly see many more of these technologies emerge. The predominant path for their development, however, is changing in a profound way.

See more in Global; Technology and Science; Defense Technology


Why No One Is Buying the Air Force’s Argument To Ditch the A-10

Author: Janine Davidson
Defense One

Janine Davidson evaluates the heated, often emotional discussion surrounding the Air Force's decision to retire the A-10 Warthog. She argues that the A-10 debate speaks to larger issues surrounding the future of close air support, and that—while there are good arguments to divest from the A-10—the Air Force has so far done a poor job communicating them.

See more in United States; Defense Technology


Walking Loudly and Carrying a Big Stick

Author: Micah Zenko
Foreign Policy

A divergence of opinions between males and females is an "enduring characteristic of polls on the use of military force, regardless of the weapons system employed, military mission undertaken, whether the intervening force is unilateral or multilateral, and the strategic objective proposed," says Micah Zenko. Citing polls from the early 1990s to today, he investigates why this persistent difference in opinion exists and what it may mean for U.S. foreign policy.

See more in United States; Defense Strategy; Defense Technology; Drones


Liaoning—Paper Tiger or Growing Cub?

Author: Colonel Brian M. Killough, USAF
Council on Foreign Relations

Colonel Brian M. Killough, USAF, says the Liaoning, China's first aircraft carrier, is a measured step in the long trek toward a globally-capable navy that an emerging superpower needs. While a solid indicator of intent, it's not a threat—yet.

See more in Defense Technology; China