Development

Event

Countering Violent Extremism by Engaging Women

In many countries, women are well-positioned to detect early signs of radicalization because their rights and physical integrity are often the first targets of extremists. In addition, they are well-placed to challenge extremist narratives in homes, schools, and communities. This session will address strategies to counter  violent extremism by capitalizing on the contributions of women.

See more in Global; Radicalization and Extremism; Women

News Release

U.S. Has Failed to Ease Adjustment to Globalization and Free Trade, Says Alden in New Book

In Failure to Adjust: How Americans Got Left Behind in the Global Economy, Council on Foreign Relations Bernard L. Schwartz Senior Fellow Edward Alden explains why the political consensus in support of trade liberalization has collapsed, and how to correct the course.  The United States has contributed more than any other nation to writing the rules that created the competitive global economy of today, helping support stronger growth in much of the world. Yet successive U.S. administrations have done far too little to help Americans succeed under those rules, says Alden.

See more in United States; China; Globalization; Trade

Event

Poor World Cities: A Conversation with Edward Glaeser

Speaker: Edward Glaeser
Presider: Thomas J. Bollyky

Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University, discusses poor world megacities, the reasons their growth differs from previous patterns of urbanization, and the implications for their residents and the world at large as part of the Global Health, Economics, and Development Roundtable Series.

See more in Global; Development

Transcript

Poor World Cities: A Conversation with Edward Glaeser

Speaker: Edward Glaeser
Presider: Thomas J. Bollyky

Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University, discusses poor world megacities, the reasons their growth differs from previous patterns of urbanization, and the implications for their residents and the world at large as part of the Global Health, Economics, and Development Roundtable Series.

See more in Global; Development

Op-Ed

More Women in Global Security Forces will Raise Effectiveness

Author: Jamille Bigio
Newsweek

Despite evidence that shows that women make unique contributions to peace and security processes, they remain severely underrepresented in military, policy, and peacekeeping forces around the world. Jamille Bigio highlights a new bill led by Senators Barbara Boxer and Jeanne Shaheen that would “require the U.S. State Department to encourage other countries to increase the number of women recruited and promoted in their security forces.” She also argues for better quality training among security forces and conversation of the U.S. National Action Plan on women, peace, and security into legislation.

See more in United States; Global; Women; Defense and Security

Article

When Women Lead Soldiers Into Battle

Author: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
The Atlantic

The ban on women in ground combat, which stood in some form ever since women were first permanently integrated into the U.S. military in 1948, has been lifted and all combat roles are now open to women. Since Defense Secretary Ash Carter announced the new policy last December, the American military has also seen women ascend to positions in its highest ranks: Air Force General Lori Robinson became the country’s first female combatant commander, and Admiral Michelle Howard became the first female four-star admiral.

See more in United States; Military Operations; Women