Diplomacy and Statecraft

Policy Innovation Memorandum No. 56

Reforming the U.S. International Military Education and Training Program

Author: Joshua Kurlantzick

The International Military Education and Training (IMET) program, which provides U.S. government funds to members of foreign militaries to take classes at U.S. military facilities, has the potential to be a powerful tool of U.S. influence. Joshua Kurlantzick explains how the program can be reformed to more effectively promote U.S. interests.

See more in Asia and Pacific; United States; Diplomacy and Statecraft; Military Leadership

Other Report

Challenging Multilateralism and the Liberal Order

While globalization has intensified the need for global cooperation, the current global order is fraying. New forms of competition are making international cooperation more difficult and will continue to do so. The sixth Princeton workshop on global governance convened scholars and former policymakers to examine the state of global governance and consider how to correct its shortcomings. 

See more in Global Governance; Diplomacy and Statecraft; Global


U.S. Relations With India

Author: Alyssa Ayres

In testimony before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations on May 24, 2016, Alyssa Ayres discussed areas of progress and the importance of managing expectations in U.S.-India relations. Drawing on recommendations made by the 2015 CFR Independent Task Force on U.S.-India Relations, Ayres recommended reframing the bilateral relationship as a joint venture instead of as a not-quite alliance, arguing that such a shift would allow for increased cooperation in areas of convergence without letting differences undermine progress.

See more in India; United States; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Other Report

New Geopolitics of China, India, and Pakistan

South Asia is in the midst of a geopolitical transformation wrought by several simultaneous developments: China’s rise, India’s rise, and attempts by the United States to recalibrate its own strategy to address new power dynamics across the arc of Asia from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean. CFR's Asia program convened a symposium to discuss the new geopolitics of southern Asia.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Diplomacy and Statecraft; Global Governance


Why the State of the World Is Better Than You Think

Authors: Stewart M. Patrick and Megan Roberts
World Politics Review

Given global headlines, observers might think the world is terribly off course, from geopolitical rivalries to Middle East mayhem. This noisy, negative narrative is not all wrong, but it has drowned out more positive developments in dealing with difficult global problems, from climate change to nonproliferation, write Stewart Patrick and Megan Roberts in World Politics Review.

See more in Global; Diplomacy and Statecraft


Why North Korean Threat Is a More Urgent Issue for Next U.S. President

Author: Scott A. Snyder

The more vulnerable Kim Jong Un feels atop a weakening North Korea, the more he seeks a silver bullet to ensure the regime's long-term survival. On May 6, Kim may enjoy a Korean Worker's Party conference that will celebrate his achievements and consolidate his rule. He may even think that his nuclear deterrent has bought time and saved money that can be used to improve North Korea's economy. But the regime's own systemic need to generate instability as a primary means of exerting domestic political control guarantees that the young leader will never have enough nuclear weapons to achieve absolute security, writes Scott Snyder, senior fellow for Korea studies and director of the program on U.S.-Korea policy at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR).

See more in North Korea; United States; Diplomacy and Statecraft; Elections