Economic Development

Transcript

A Conversation with Helen Clark

Speaker: Helen Clark
Presider: George Rupp

Helen Clark discusses the 2013 Human Development Report, The Rise of the South: Human Progress in a Diverse World. The report identifies more than forty developing countries that have done better than expected in human development in recent decades, with their progress accelerating markedly over the past ten years

See more in Global; Economic Development

Op-Ed

Ten Questions for the New BRICS Bank

Author: Isobel Coleman
Foreign Policy

The recent announcement of a BRICS development bank raised many questions. Isobel Coleman writes about the potential structure and purpose of the BRICS development bank and its implications for international development and the global economy.

See more in India; Brazil; Economic Development

Primary Sources

Remarks by President Obama after Meeting with African Leaders, March 2013

Author: Barack Obama

President Obama met with President Sall from Senegal, President Banda from Malawi, President Koroma from Sierra Leone, and Prime Minister Neves from Cape Verde on March 28, 2013. The four presidents discussed the progress their countries have made in democracy and economic development.

See more in Africa (sub-Saharan); United States; Economic Development; Democratization

Ask CFR Experts

Where do you see Brazil in 2020? As a country with the lowest growth rates among the BRICS, is the dream over for Brazil?

Asked by Fagner Dantas, from Universidade Federal da Bahia

The Brazilian government faces a number of challenges and opportunities concerning its economic forecast in the coming years. After peaking at 7.5 percent growth in 2010, Brazil's recent economic slowdown has caused worry that the dream of a new high-growth economy had slipped out of reach.

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See more in Brazil; Economic Development; Emerging Markets; Global Future Trends

Article

Egypt’s Financial High Noon

Author: Isobel Coleman
Foreign Policy

Isobel Coleman writes that while it is widely recognized that food and fuel subsidies in Egypt are expensive and inefficient, Egyptian leaders do not want to touch the political third rail of subsidy reform. But they also realize that the country's fiscal situation is untenable without it. Sooner or later, serious subsidy reform is inevitable, and a well-planned process is preferable to the alternative.

See more in Egypt; Economic Development

Must Read

Lloyd's: Arctic Opening: Opportunity and Risk in the High North

Authors: Charles Emmerson and Glada Lahn

The Arctic region is undergoing unprecedented and disruptive change. Its climate is changing more rapidly than anywhere else on earth. Rising temperatures are causing a retreat of sea ice and changes to seasonal length, weather patterns and ecosystems. These changes have prompted a reassessment of economic and development potential in the Arctic and are giving rise to a set of far-reaching political developments.

See more in Economic Development; Climate Change; Arctic

Foreign Affairs Article

Mexico Makes It

Author: Shannon K. O'Neil

Even as Mexico continues to struggle with grave security threats, its steady rise is transforming the country's economy, society, and political system. Given the Mexico's bright future and the interests it shares with the United States in energy, manufacturing, and security, Washington needs to start seeing its southern neighbor as a partner instead of a problem.

See more in Mexico; Economic Development; Latin America and the Caribbean

Ask CFR Experts

Is China still “rising” or has it already “risen”?

Asked by Lauren Billi, from New York University

Both are accurate. China certainly "has risen" to become a global economic power: in only three decades, it has transformed itself into the world's second largest economy, largest exporter, and largest provider of loans to the developing world. At the same time, China is rising: its economic and political system, as well as its foreign policy, is still developing. To state categorically that China "has risen" is to accept that the China of today will be substantially the same as the China of five to ten years from now, and few people in or outside China would accept such a conclusion.

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See more in China; Economic Development

Book

Why Growth Matters

Authors: Jagdish N. Bhagwati and Arvind Panagariya

Two preeminent experts on the Indian economy argue that despite myriad development strategies, only one can succeed in alleviating poverty: the overall growth of the country's economy.

See more in India; Economic Development

Audio

Diversifying Global Supply Chains

Speakers: Astrid Pregel, Anabella Ruiz de Freeman, and Elizabeth Vazquez
Presider: Isobel Coleman

Astrid Pregel, Anabella Ruiz de Freeman, and Elizabeth Vazquez discuss the opportunities and challenges to integrating women-owned businesses into global supply chains.

See more in Women; Economic Development; Global