Issues

Must Read

Belfer Center: Advancing Nuclear Security: Evaluating Progress and Setting New Goals

Authors: Matthew Bunn, Martin B. Malin, Nickolas Roth, and William H. Tobey

"The threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism has not disappeared, though the world has made important progress in reducing these risks. Urgent new steps are needed to build effective and lasting nuclear security worldwide. The nuclear security effort must now shift from short-term improvements toward a focus on a continued search for excellence, lasting as long as terrorist groups bent on mass destruction and the nuclear and radiological materials they might use both continue to exist."

See more in Global; Politics and Strategy

Interview

NATO's Next Moves

Christopher S. Chivvis interviewed by Jonathan Masters

NATO's response to Russia's annexation of Crimea may require it to bolster eastern European members with both military and non-military actions, says expert Christopher S. Chivvis.

See more in Ukraine; NATO

Must Read

New York Times Magazine: What Pakistan Knew About Bin Laden

Author: Carlotta Gall

"America's failure to fully understand and actively confront Pakistan on its support and export of terrorism is one of the primary reasons President Karzai has become so disillusioned with the United States. As American and NATO troops prepare to withdraw from Afghanistan by the end of this year, the Pakistani military and its Taliban proxy forces lie in wait, as much a threat as any that existed in 2001."

See more in Pakistan; Terrorism

Must Read

Financial Times: Prise Ukraine From Putin’s Claws

Author: Martin Wolf

"The west is not going to war with a nuclear-armed Russia. But outright annexation of a part of a smaller country strikes at the roots of the post-second world war European settlement. Angela Merkel, Germany's chancellor, was right to say that Russia had resorted to the "law of the jungle". This annexation cannot go unanswered. It is too dangerous a precedent."

See more in Ukraine; Territorial Disputes

Primary Sources

Russian President Putin's Remarks on Treaty with Crimea

Author: Vladimir Putin

Russian President Vladimir Putin gave these remarks before the Russian parliament, stating that Crimea could become a part of Russia. After the speech, Russian and Crimean officials signed a treaty to unify the two regions. The United Nations passed a resolution on March 27, 2014, on Ukraine's territory.

See more in Russian Federation; Ukraine; Ethnicity, Minorities, and National Identity; Sovereignty