Economics

Article

Why Argentina’s Macri Could Have a Rockier Year in 2017

Author: Shannon K. O'Neil
Fortune.com

Argentine President Mauricio Macri and his team can take a bow for their first year in office. Despite Macri’s outsider status and his party’s limited influence in the Congress, he in short order took on the country’s biggest economic distortions—unifying the exchange rate, resolving the fight with international creditors, cutting energy subsidies, reestablishing credible statistics, and eliminating a whole host of tariffs, quotas, and export licenses.

See more in Argentina; Presidents and Chiefs of State; Economics

Article

Trump Says Europe Is in Trouble. He Has a Point.

Author: Sebastian Mallaby
The Washington Post

Germany’s foreign minister reports “astonishment and agitation.” The French president protests indignantly about unsolicited “outside advice .” Even Secretary of State John F. Kerry sees behavior that is “inappropriate.” President-elect Donald Trump’s weekend interview, in which he casually predicted the breakup of the European Union, has certainly attracted attention.

See more in Europe; Politics and Strategy; Economics

Article

Three Hard Questions for Rex Tillerson About Russia Sanctions

Author: Stephen Sestanovich
Wall Street Journal

When Rex Tillerson, Exxon Mobil Corp.’s longtime chief executive and now Donald Trump’s choice to be secretary of state, appears before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday, he will get a lot of questions about his relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin. If senators want a better conversation with Mr. Tillerson, they should get him to acknowledge—or dispute—the basic facts of Russian-American relations. Stephen Sestanovich presents three questions aimed at getting Tillerson to admit how much sanctions have accomplished. 

See more in Russian Federation; Sanctions; Politics and Strategy

Other Report

Global Economics Monthly January 2017

Author: Robert Kahn

Steven A. Tananbaum Senior Fellow for International Economics Robert Kahn writes that markets showed impressive resilience in the face of a range of geopolitical shocks in 2016, but recent market moves suggest this year could be different. A greater range of possible, if unlikely, political challenges, as well as U.S. monetary policy normalization, could bring a crisis back to the fore. 

See more in Global; Economics

Event

A Conversation With Shauna Olney

Speaker: Shauna Olney
Presider: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

Women’s economic advancement is a primary driver of economic growth and development. In this roundtable, Shauna Olney addresses gender inequalities across a variety of labor market indicators, including quantity and quality of jobs. She also discusses the policies that are necessary to improve women’s labor market participation.

See more in Global; Economics

Event

A Conversation with Martha Chen

Speaker: Martha Chen
Presider: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

Martha Chen addressed the overrepresentation of women in the informal economy and the challenges they face – including low earnings and lack of social protections, which reinforce the cycle of poverty. She also discussed the resources women need to overcome these challenges and the strategic imperative for more inclusive and equitable policy.

See more in Global; Economics

Op-Ed

The End of an Era

Author: Edward Alden
USNews

“In selecting a president who campaigned openly on trade and immigration restrictions, the United States has called a halt to a half century of openness. Whether the next four years become a wholesale retreat from the world or merely a pause for retooling now rests on the shoulders of perhaps the most mercurial and least-experienced man ever elected to the nation's highest office,” argues Edward Alden after the election of Donald Trump. 

See more in United States; Trade; Immigration

Event

Innovative Financing Mechanisms: Strategic Philanthropy and Impact Bonds

Speaker: John Fairhurst
Speaker: Debra Messing
Speaker: Kate Roberts
Presider: Rachel B. Vogelstein

The international development financing landscape is changing. Today, official development assistance now comprises only 2 percent of financing flows in the developing world. New approaches to financing are needed to address pressing development challenges, including persistent inequalities for women and girls. Drawing upon their respective experiences, Fairhurst, Roberts, and Messing discuss two promising financing mechanisms: strategic philanthropy and impact bonds.

See more in Global; Economics