Education

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The Chronicle of Higher Education: Qatar Sets Its Own Terms for U.S. Universities

Author: Ursula Lindsey

"'How do you transform into a nation without also transforming the traditional, monarchical, patriarchal system?' [historian Allen Fromherz] asks. As the small but natural-gas-rich country emerges onto the world's stage, this and other questions are unavoidable: Are the American universities actors in the country's future or merely props? Can they teach students to think critically about the contradictions and changes in Qatar while under the patronage of its ruling family?"

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Must Read Author: Megan McArdle

Megan McArdle examines whether college is a worthwhile investment in a time when the rising costs are leaving parents and students with large amounts of debt and college degrees no longer guarantee a job after graduation.

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FP: The Madrasa Myth

Authors: Tahir Andrabi, Jishnu Das, C. Christine Fair, and Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Four authors argue that in the fight to save the country's next generation, more should be done towards building up mainstream and affordable private schools in Pakistan.

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The Jamestown Foundation: The Father of the Taliban: An Interview with Maulana Sami ul-Haq

Author: Imtiaz Ali

In the Jamestown Foundation’s Spotlight on Terror series, an interview with Maulana Sami ul-Haq, the director and chancellor of Pakistan's madrassa, Darul uloom Haqqania, Akora Khattak, where many of the top Taliban leaders, including its fugitive chief, Mullah Omar, attended. It is widely believed that the madrassa was the launching pad for the Taliban movement in the early 1990s, which is why Sami ul-Haq is also called the "Father of the Taliban."

See more in Terrorism; Pakistan; Education

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Oxfam: Free, Quality Education for Every Afghan Child

According to this report from Oxfam half of the children in Afghanistan still do not go to school despite a 500 per cent increase in enrolments in the last six years. This briefing paper outlines some of the key concerns, and proposes a plan for not only increased funding, but also reforming budget allocation and planning within the Ministry of Education and amongst other actors in the education sector.

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