Education

Must Read

The Jamestown Foundation: The Father of the Taliban: An Interview with Maulana Sami ul-Haq

Author: Imtiaz Ali

In the Jamestown Foundation’s Spotlight on Terror series, an interview with Maulana Sami ul-Haq, the director and chancellor of Pakistan's madrassa, Darul uloom Haqqania, Akora Khattak, where many of the top Taliban leaders, including its fugitive chief, Mullah Omar, attended. It is widely believed that the madrassa was the launching pad for the Taliban movement in the early 1990s, which is why Sami ul-Haq is also called the "Father of the Taliban."

See more in Terrorism; Pakistan; Education

Transcript

American Universities in the Middle East: Agents of Change in the Arab World

Speakers: David Arnold, Joseph Jabbra, Winfred Thompson, and John Waterbury
Presider: Lee Bollinger

The four American university presidents in the Middle East discuss the importance and value of American-style liberal arts education inE gypt, Lebanon, and the Gulf, and how it can work to create social change in the Arab world.

See more in Middle East and North Africa; Information Warfare; Education

Foreign Affairs Article

College Goes Global

Author: William Brody

The market for higher education, like others, is becoming increasingly globalized -- and dominated by U.S. institutions. But despite predictions that U.S.-based global universities will surge as geographic and disciplinary barriers come down, the era of the global "megaversity" may not quite be at hand.

See more in China; Education

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Oxfam: Free, Quality Education for Every Afghan Child

According to this report from Oxfam half of the children in Afghanistan still do not go to school despite a 500 per cent increase in enrolments in the last six years. This briefing paper outlines some of the key concerns, and proposes a plan for not only increased funding, but also reforming budget allocation and planning within the Ministry of Education and amongst other actors in the education sector.

See more in Education; Afghanistan

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WashPost: This is a Saudi textbook. (After the intolerance was removed.)

Author: Nina Shea

After the attacks of September 11, 2001, a 2004 Saudi royal study group recognized the exigency to reform educational material in Saudi Arabia's public school curriculum. The study found that the Saudi public education system advocates a problematic legacy in their religious curriculum that condones violence, repression, and intolerance. Prince Turki al-Faisal, the Saudi ambassador to the United States, made public claims that the Saudi curriculum had been recently reviewed and revised to meet the needs of a more modern education. However, recent copies of Islamic Saudi textbooks that have been translated into English reveal a lack of modernization, which contradicts assertions of Saudi educational reform.

See more in Education; Religion; Saudi Arabia