Emerging Markets

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EPW: India and Bretton Woods II

Authors: Aaditya Mattoo and Arvind Subramanian

The G-20 meeting in Washington on November 15 is an opportunity for India to help shape the new global economic architecture in line with its strategic interests. India should propose short-term crisis response actions and suggest a clear medium-term agenda.

See more in Financial Crises; Emerging Markets; India

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FT: A New World for America's Next President

Authors: Robert D. Hormats and Jim O'Neill

Robert Hormats and Jim O'Neil of Goldman Sachs International write that the next president will need a new set of policies to address a changing global economy. They say the United States must "boost its own competitiveness and further open foreign markets for its goods and services." They also call for the creation of a "more representative global economic policy architecture to reflect the ongoing shifts in financial wealth, commodity power and trade flows."

See more in United States; Emerging Markets

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IEA: Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions from the Global Cement Industry

Authors: Cecilia Tam, Michael Taylor, and Dolf Gielen

Global cement production grew significantly from 1970 to 2005, with the vast majority of the growth occurring in developing countries. In terms of CO2 emissions, cement production is the most important activity in the non-metallic minerals category. This paper sets out some of the initial data collected for a separate IEA analysis report on the energy demand, CO2 emissions and CO2 emission reduction opportunities in the cement industry.

See more in Economic Development; Emerging Markets; Climate Change

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GMF: Romania, Bulgaria, and the EU's Future

Author: Robin Shepherd

Romania and Bulgaria have entered a European Union that has stalled at a crossroads, says this commentary from the German Marshall Fund of the United States. The paper discusses the various ways the new EU members will influence policymaking in the EU.

See more in Emerging Markets

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Foreign Policy: The Dark Side of China's Rise

China’s economic boom has dazzled investors and captivated the world. But beyond the new high-rises and churning factories lie rampant corruption, vast waste, and an elite with little interest in making things better. Forget political reform. China’s future will be decay, not democracy.

See more in China; Emerging Markets