Genocide

Foreign Affairs Article

Rebooting Rwanda

Author: Paul Kagame

On April 6, 1994, a plane carrying Rwandan President Juvénal Habyarimana was shot down by unidentified assailants. The next day, the killings began. Over the next three months, as the international community stood by, an estimated one million Rwandans—Tutsis and moderate Hutus—were systematically slaughtered by Hutu extremists, mostly using clubs and machetes.

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Audio

Symposium on International Law and Justice, Session One: International Obligations Toward Victims of Mass Atrocities (Audio)

Speakers: Wesley K. Clark, Victoria Holt, and Edward C. Luck
Introductory Speaker: Richard N. Haass
Presider: David J. Scheffer

Listen to experts discuss the Responsibility to Protect Doctrine with regard to the United States' and other governments' response to genocide and mass suffering.

This session was part of the CFR Symposium on International Law and Justice, which was made possible through the generous support of the Jolie-Pitt Foundation.

See more in International Law; Genocide; Global

Audio

Symposium on International Law and Justice, Session Three: The Darfur Case (Audio)

Speaker: Luis Moreno-Ocampo
Introductory Speaker: Angelina Jolie
Presider: Nicholas D. Kristof

Listen to International Criminal Court prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo discuss the Darfur case, with introductory remarks by United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Goodwill Ambassador Angelina Jolie.

This session was part of the CFR Symposium on International Law and Justice, which was made possible through the generous support of the Jolie-Pitt Foundation.

See more in International Law; Genocide; Sudan

Council Special Report No. 49

Intervention to Stop Genocide and Mass Atrocities

Author: Matthew C. Waxman

Recent events in Darfur raise the familiar question of whether international law facilitates the kind of early, decisive, and coherent action needed to effectively combat genocide. Matthew C. Waxman argues that putting decisions about international intervention solely in the hands of the UN Security Council risks undermining the threat or use of intervention when it may be most potent in stopping mass atrocities.

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Must Read

USIP: Preventing Genocide: A Blueprint for U.S. Policymakers

Authors: Madeleine K. Albright and William S. Cohen

This report by the United States Institute of Peace outlines the specific actions U.S. policymakers can take to prevent genocide, ranging from institution building to international parternships.

The Genocide Prevention Task Force was launched on November 13, 2007 and released its report to the public on December 8, 2008. It was jointly convened by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, The American Academy of Diplomacy, and the U.S. Institute of Peace.  It was funded by private foundations.  Its goals were: (1) To spotlight genocide prevention as a national priority; and; (2) To develop practical policy recommendations to enhance the capacity of the U.S. government to respond to emerging threats of genocide and mass atrocities.

The report, which is entitled "Preventing Genocide: A Blueprint for U.S. Policymakers", asserts that genocide is preventable, and that making progress toward doing so begins with leadership and political will.  The report provides 34 recommendations, starting with the need for high-level attention, standing institutional mechanisms, and strong international partnerships to respond to potential genocidal situations when they arise; it lays out a comprehensive approach, recommending improved early warning mechanisms, early action to prevent crises, timely diplomatic responses to emerging crises, greater preparedness to employ military options, and action to strengthen global norms and institutions.

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