Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights

Foreign Affairs Article

The Long Arm of International Law

Author: Pierre N. Leval

Thanks to a once-obscure law passed in 1789, foreign victims of foreign human rights abusers can use U.S. courts to sue their abusers. But the Supreme Court may soon ban such suits. That would be a shame, since they offer victims some measure of solace and give substance to underenforced human rights laws. The law should be upheld, and other countries should follow the U.S. lead.

See more in Courts and Tribunals; Human Rights; Global

Foreign Affairs Article

Do Less Harm

Author: Sarah Holewinski

The Afghanistan and Iraq wars taught the United States painful lessons about the need to limit harm to civilians and compensate victims for their suffering.

See more in Peacekeeping

Foreign Affairs Article

The Life of the Party

Author: Eric X. Li

In the next decade, China will continue to rise, not fade. Its leaders will consolidate the one-party model and, in the process, challenge the West's smug certainty about political development and the inevitable march toward electoral democracy.

See more in China; Democratization

Foreign Affairs Article

After Qaddafi

Author: Dirk Vandewalle

The September 11 killing of the U.S. ambassador to Libya, Christopher Stevens, and three other Americans during an attack by an angry mob on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi has concentrated the world's attention on the problems of post-Qaddafi Libya.

See more in Democratization; Libya

Foreign Affairs Article

Peace Out

Author: Walter Russell Mead

Every aspiring beauty-pageant queen knows what to say when asked what she wants most: "World peace." World peace is at least nominally what we all want most. But evidently, we are not very good at making it.

See more in Global; Peacekeeping

Foreign Affairs Article

Point of Order

Authors: Amitai Etzioni and G. John Ikenberry

Before complaining about China's refusal to buy into the liberal world order, argues Amitai Etzioni, the West should stop moving the goalposts by developing new norms of intervention, such as "the responsibility to protect."

See more in China; Humanitarian Intervention