Global Governance

Article

Holding Sway

Author: Jerome A. Cohen
South China Morning Post

Jerome A. Cohen says the Communist Party's sustained efforts since June 4 to influence China's courts for its own ends may be easing, but judicial independence is still a long way off.

See more in China; International Law

Article

Missing Mahmoud

Author: Reza Aslan
Foreign Policy

With Ayatollah Khamenei set to replace Mahmoud Ahmadinejad with a "fawning admirer" of his choosing, Ahmadinejad may be missed for his ability to challenge the Islamic Republic's ruling religious hierarchy.

See more in Iran; Global Governance

Article

Law and Ethics for Autonomous Weapon Systems: Why a Ban Won’t Work and How the Laws of War Can

Authors: Matthew C. Waxman and Kenneth Anderson

Grounded in a realistic assessment of technology, Matthew C. Waxman and Kenneth Anderson outline a practical alternative with which to evaluate the use of autonomous weaponry that incorporates codes of conduct based on traditional legal and ethical principles governing weapons and warfare.

See more in United States; Drones; International Law

Article

The Reluctant Democrats

Author: Joshua Kurlantzick
National Post

In the third of three excerpts from his new book, Democracy in Retreat, Joshua Kurlantzick says that emerging powers like India, Brazil and South Africa were supposed to be democracy's greatest proponents, but that it hasn't worked out that way at all.

See more in Democratization; Rule of Law

Article

Law and Ethics for Robot Soldiers

Authors: Kenneth Anderson and Matthew C. Waxman
Policy Review

Kenneth Anderson and Matthew C. Waxman say some view automated technology developments as a crisis for the laws of war. But provided we start now to incorporate ethical and legal norms into weapons design, the incremental movement from automation to genuine machine autonomy already underway might well be made to serve the ends of law on the battlefield.

See more in International Law; Wars and Warfare; United States

Article

Libya: A Multilateral Constitutional Moment?

Author: Catherine Powell
Social Science Research Network

The Libya intervention of 2011 marked the first time that the UN Security Council invoked the "responsibility to protect" principle (RtoP) to authorize use of force by UN member states. In this comment the author argues that the Security Council's invocation of RtoP in the midst of the Libyan crisis significantly deepens the broader, ongoing transformation in the international law system's approach to sovereignty and civilian protection.

See more in Libya; International Law

Article

Joint Task Force Odyssey Dawn: A Model for Joint Experience, Training, and Education

Authors: Gregory K. James, Larry Holcomb, and Colonel Chad T. Manske, USAF
Joint Force Quarterly

Colonel Gregory K. James, USA; Colonel Larry Holcomb, USMC; and Colonel Chad T. Manske, USAF argue that the success of Operation ODYSSEY DAWN, despite its complexity, validates joint planning processes, joint education foundations, joint training opportunities, and joint exercises.

See more in Humanitarian Intervention; Wars and Warfare; International Organizations and Alliances; Libya