Global Governance

Analysis Brief

Taylor Faces War Crimes Hearing

Former Liberian president and strongman Charles Taylor has been taken to Sierra Leone under UN custody to face war crimes proceedings. His case will be watched closely on a continent where predatory leaders are rarely held accountable for their crimes.

See more in Courts and Tribunals; Liberia

Analysis Brief

Closure Sought on Kosovo

Kosovo's independence is in view, experts say, after years of war, occupation, ethnic infighting, and protracted negotiations. Final settlement talks are aiming to close a chapter on one of Europe's most intractable disputes.

See more in Kosovo; Sovereignty


A Role for the World Trade Organization on Regulatory Coherence

Author: Thomas J. Bollyky
The E15 Initiative

The way the world trades has changed since the World Trade Organization (WTO) was established. Fewer goods and services originate from any one supplier or country. Components and intermediate services are increasingly sourced and assembled from specialist suppliers around the world. Regulation also plays a more significant role in this era of international trade. The adequacy of regulatory oversight has become more important as complex, unbundled global supply chains have become harder for businesses and customers to monitor.

See more in Global; Global Governance


Iran, Sanctions, and the Illusion of a Better Bargain

Author: Miles Kahler

At this point in time, given the current Iranian leadership, the state of Iranian public opinion, and Iranian economic conditions, relying on unilateral economic leverage to obtain a better deal is an illusion, argues Miles Kahler. More likely it would drive Iran further in the direction of North Korea—an unrestrained nuclear program and an economically isolated, unreformed regime. 

See more in Iran; United States; Treaties and Agreements


Valdai Paper #22: Multilateralism à la Carte: The New World of Global Governance

Author: Stewart M. Patrick
The Valdai Discussion Club

U.S. and foreign policymakers increasingly pursue their national objectives through narrower and more flexible frameworks whose membership varies with situational interests, shared values, and relevant capabilities. The trick for the United States and other major governments is to design à la carte mechanisms that complement and reinvigorate, rather than undermine and marginalize, the prix fixe menu of formal international organizations upon which the world continues to depend, argues Stewart Patrick.


See more in United States; Global; International Organizations and Alliances