Grand Strategy

Primary Sources

Remarks on Foreign Policy by President Obama

On May 28, 2014, at West Point Academy's graduation ceremony, President Obama discussed his vision for the future of the U.S. military and U.S. leadership in the world, regarding protection of the United States from immediate threats, counterterrorism efforts, transparency, multilateral action, and international law. On May 29, 2014, National Public Radio (NPR) interviewed President Obama about the speech and his foreign policy agenda, particularly on Syria, Ukraine, China, and Guantanamo Bay prison.

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Remarks by President Obama and Japanese President Abe

President Obama and Japanese President Abe Shinzo held this press conference on April 24, 2014, and released several fact sheets on U.S.-Japan collaboration in the areas of security, stability and prosperity, technology, and energy. President Obama traveled to Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, and the Phillipines as part of his administration's rebalance to Asia, a policy to strengthen U.S. economic and political relations in the region.

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Press Conference with President Obama and President Park of the Republic of Korea

President Obama and South Korean President Park Geun-hye held a press conference on April 25, 2014. They released the Joint Fact Sheet on the U.S.-Korea Alliance, which discusses collaboration in peace and security; climate change and energy; international development; economics; and science, technology, and health. President Obama traveled to Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, and the Phillipines as part of his administration's rebalance to Asia, a policy to strengthen U.S. economic and political relations in the region.

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Secretary Hagel's Remarks at People's Liberation Army National Defense University

Secretary Chuck Hagel traveled to China and Japan as part of the Obama administration's rebalance to the Asia Pacific region. On April 8, 2014, he spoke at the PLA's National Defense University about military-to-military relations and took questions about the U.S. stance on East China Sea and South China Sea disputes, the status of Taiwan, and the rapid economic development in China.

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President Obama: State of the Union Address

The State of the Union is a speech given annually by the president to Congress, in which the president outlines the current condition of the United States and national priorities for the coming year, based on the U.S. Constitution, Article Two, Section Three. President Obama has delivered his State of the Union Address speeches on January 27, 2010, January 25, 2011, January 24, 2012, February 12, 2013, and January 28, 2014.

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Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Marciel's Testimony on the Rebalance to Asia

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary in the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, Scot Marciel, testified on December 18, 2013 about the economic aspects of the Obama Administration's rebalance to Asia, before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs.

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Asahi Shimbun Interview with Vice President Biden

The Asahi Shimbun, a Japanese newspaper, conducted a written interview with Vice President Joe Biden on December 2, 2013, before the vice president's trip to China, Japan, and South Korea. The interview covers China's announcement of its Air Defense Identification Zone, the Trans-Pacific Partnership, defense and cybersecurity alliances, and the Obama administration's "pivot to Asia."

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Article

Syria, Threats of Force, and Constitutional War Powers

Author: Matthew C. Waxman
Yale Law Journal Online

Matthew Waxman argues that debates about constitutional war powers neglect the critical role of threats of war or force in U.S. foreign policy. The recent Syria case highlights the President's vast legal power to threaten military force as well as the political constraints imposed by Congress on such threats. Incorporating threats into an understanding of constitutional powers over war and peace upends traditional arguments about presidential flexibility and congressional checks—arguments that have failed to keep pace with changes in U.S. grand strategy.

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