Grand Strategy

Must Read

RAND: Securing Tyrants or Fostering Reform?

Authors: Seth G. Jones, Olga Oliker, Peter Chalk, C. Chrstine Fair, Rollie Lal, and James Dobbins

This report from Rand examines U.S. government assistance to the police and internal security agencies of repressive and transitioning states. The report notes that throughout its history, the United States has provided assistance to a number of countries that have not shared its political ideals. Their security forces were not accountable to the public, and their practices and approaches were not transparent. The report suggests that U.S. efforts to improve the security, human rights, and accountability of repressive internal security forces are most likely to be successfu when states are in the process of a transition from repressive to democratic systems.

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Primary Sources

National Intelligence Strategy, 2005

This document puts forth a new ten-point national intelligence strategy that addresses the security objectives laid out in the National Security Strategy. It recognizes the need for better unification of the intelligence community, stating "our strategy is to integrate, through intelligence policy, doctrine, and technology, the different enterprises of the Intelligence Community."

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Book

Power, Terror, Peace, and War

Author: Walter Russell Mead

In Power, Terror, Peace, and War, Mead—one of the most original writers on U.S. foreign policy—provides a fascinating and timely account of the Bush administration's foreign policy and its current grand strategy for the world.

See more in United States; Grand Strategy; Terrorism

Teaching Note

Power, Terror, Peace, and War

Author: Walter Russell Mead

In Power, Terror, Peace, and War, Mead—one of the most original writers on U.S. foreign policy—provides a fascinating and timely account of the Bush administration's foreign policy and its current grand strategy for the world. He analyzes America's historical approach to the world, which he describes as not perfect but reasonably moral and reasonably practical. President Bush, according to Mead, is often strategically right but tactically at fault while he attempts to lead a divided nation—and a divided coalition of allies—in a dangerous struggle against ruthless enemies.

See more in Terrorism; United States; Grand Strategy