Homeland Security

Interview

Ibrahim: Dubai May Benefit From 45-Day Study of U.S. Ports Deal

Youssef Michel Ibrahim interviewed by Bernard Gwertzman

Youssef Ibrahim, managing director of Dubai-based Strategic Energy Investment Group, and a former Middle East correspondent for the New York Times, says the pending deal for Dubai Ports World to administer the ports in major U.S. cities is not a security concern in a technical sense. But he says it is worthwhile for the 45-day study to go ahead. "Some good will come out of this. It may even be good for Dubai," says Ibrahim, who is also a former senior fellow in Middle Eastern studies at CFR.

See more in Homeland Security; United Arab Emirates

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WSJ: Presumption of Guilt

In Mexico's dysfunctional legal system, an arrest most often leads to a conviction. Exposing both that corruption and a glimpse of hope, David  Luhnow follows the story of one street vendor--wrongly convicted of murder--who won his freedom thanks to an unconventional approach by two determined lawyers.

See more in Homeland Security; Mexico; Rule of Law

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NYT: All Too Quiet on the Homeland Front

Author: Clark Ervin

Clark Kent Ervin, inspector general of the Homeland Security Department from 2003 to 2004, says the presidential candidates must explain "exactly what they think the federal government has done right and done wrong in the seven years since 9/11 in securing this country against another terrorist attack." Ervin provides a list of questions related to homeland security policy for the candidates to answer.

See more in Homeland Security; United States

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Common Dreams: War on Terror Mercenaries I

Author: Thomas Barnett

Two journalist reports first published in The Independent newspaper in the UK and the Philadelphia Inquirer in the US on the proliferation of mercenary forces in Iraq and elsewhere with a “licence to kill”. The Independent’s report says that the immunity enjoyed by civilian security contractors in Iraq is generating a daily series of “legal” murders of Iraqis. The Philadelphia Inquirers report argues that the increasing use of mercenary forces is on the verge of threatening US civil liberties in the name of protecting homeland security.

See more in Iraq; Homeland Security; United States