Human Rights

Foreign Affairs Article

The Long Arm of International Law

Author: Pierre N. Leval

Thanks to a once-obscure law passed in 1789, foreign victims of foreign human rights abusers can use U.S. courts to sue their abusers. But the Supreme Court may soon ban such suits. That would be a shame, since they offer victims some measure of solace and give substance to underenforced human rights laws. The law should be upheld, and other countries should follow the U.S. lead.

See more in Courts and Tribunals; Human Rights; Global

Foreign Affairs Article

Arrested Development

Authors: J. Brian Atwood, M. Peter McPherson, and Andrew S. Natsios

USAID has become ineffective because it is underfunded, understaffed, and losing influence. The next president should revive it by either making it autonomous or elevating it to a cabinet-level department.

See more in United States; Human Rights

Foreign Affairs Article

After Guantánamo

Author: Kenneth Roth

The U.S. detention facility at Guantánamo Bay has become a stain on the United States' reputation. Shutting it down will cause new problems. Rather than hold terrorism suspects in preventive detention, the United States should turn them over to its criminal justice system.

See more in Human Rights

Foreign Affairs Article

Asia's Forgotten Crisis

Authors: Michael Green and Derek Mitchell

Over the past decade, Burma has gone from being an antidemocratic embarrassment and humanitarian disaster to being a serious threat to its neighbors' security. The international community must change its approach to the country's junta.

See more in Burma/Myanmar; Human Rights

Analysis Brief

Assessing Myanmar's Reforms

Author: Jayshree Bajoria

Secretary Clinton is in Myanmar to gauge recent reforms by the military-backed regime. Experts are calling for further democratization, including strengthening the rule of law and reconciliation with ethnic minority groups.

See more in Burma/Myanmar; Human Rights

Analysis Brief

Angola Rising

Author: Stephanie Hanson

Angolans headed to the polls on September 5 for their first election in sixteen years. The country is in the midst of a remarkable oil boom, but average Angolans remain among the world's poorest.

See more in Human Rights; Angola; Elections