Politics and Strategy

Must Read

Radio Free Europe: Tiny Moldova Faces Its East-West Moment Of Truth

Author: Robert Coalson

"Torn between Russia and the West, Moldova's fault lines are visible everywhere and are rendered more volatile by the country's weak sense of national identity. And the tension is clearly being strained by the crisis in neighboring Ukraine, as well as by Moldova's successful European-integration drive -- and Moscow's determination to prevent it."

See more in Moldova; Politics and Strategy

Transcript

Media Call on President Obama's Trip to Asia

Speakers: Sheila A. Smith and Joshua Kurlantzick
Presider: James M. Lindsay

In April 2014, President Obama left on his rescheduled trip to Asia, making stops in Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Senior Fellow for Japan Studies Sheila Smith and Senior Fellow for Southeast Asia Joshua Kurlantzick discussed the president's priorities in Asia prior to his trip.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Interactive

Timeline: U.S.-Cuba Relations

Following Fidel Castro's ascent to power, U.S.-Cuba ties have endured a nuclear crisis, a long-lasting U.S. economic embargo, and ongoing political hostilities. Well beyond the end of the Cold War, the diplomatic relationship between Washington and Havana remains frozen.

See more in Cuba; Politics and Strategy

Op-Ed

Obama Is on the Right Course with His Reorientation Toward Asia

Author: Thomas E. Donilon
Washington Post

Questions have arisen in recent months about the sustainability of the United States' rebalance toward Asia. The costly cancellation of President Obama's trip to the region during the U.S. government shutdown last fall fueled that skepticism, which has only grown as urgent foreign policy challenges have required U.S. leadership in the Middle East and Europe.

See more in Asia and Pacific; Diplomacy and Statecraft

Must Read

New America Foundation: Strategic Empathy

Author: Matt Waldman

"Empathy can provide insights into how other actors are likely to perceive and react to what the United States does, and expose false assumptions that sometimes underpin strategic mistakes.This kind of information is critical as the United States weighs options for action–coercive or otherwise–in Syria, Ukraine and beyond. The case of Afghanistan shows that the human, financial and geopolitical costs are too high for empathy to be ignored."

See more in United States; Afghanistan; Politics and Strategy