Internet Policy

Analysis Brief

China's Internet Partners

A congressional panel is highlighting what one member called "abhorrent actions" in China on the part of U.S. software makers, whose Internet search engines in that market are used by Beijing to censor speech and track dissent. Should software companies be expected to enforce democratic notions of free expression or to forego the world's fastest-growing market?

See more in China; Censorship and Freedom of Speech; Internet Policy

Primary Sources

Framework for Global Electronic Commerce

The Clinton administration released the Framework for Global Electronic Commerce on July 1, 1997. The framework describes how to "accelerate the growth of global commerce across the Internet" and the role of the U.S. government and guidelines for international negotiations. The framework privatized the domain name system (DNS), which is governed by the nonprofit Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN).

See more in United States; Global; Internet Policy; Trade

Event

Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet: Report of the CFR-Sponsored Independent Task Force on U.S. Policy in the Digital Age

The CFR-sponsored Task Force report, Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet, finds that as more people and services become interconnected and dependent on the Internet, societies are becoming increasingly vulnerable to cyberattacks. To support security, innovation, growth, and the free flow of information, the Task Force recommends that the United States and its partners work to build a cyber alliance, make the free flow of information a part of all future trade agreements, and articulate an inclusive and robust vision of Internet governance. The Task Force is chaired by John D. Negroponte, former deputy secretary of state and director of national intelligence, and Samuel J. Palmisano, former chairman of the board and chief executive officer of IBM, and is directed by Adam Segal, CFR's Maurice R. Greenberg senior fellow in China Studies. The Task Force includes distinguished members and observers from industry, academia, and nonprofits.

Independent Task Force reports are consensus documents that offer analysis and policy prescriptions for major U.S. foreign policy issues facing the United States, developed through private and nonpartisan deliberations among a group of high-level experts.

See more in United States; Cybersecurity; Internet Policy

Event

Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet: Report of the CFR-Sponsored Independent Task Force on U.S. Policy in the Digital Age

The CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force report, Defending an Open, Global, Secure, and Resilient Internet, finds that as more people and services become interconnected and dependent on the Internet, societies are becoming increasingly vulnerable to cyberattacks. To support security, innovation, growth, and the free flow of information, the Task Force recommends that the United States and its partners work to build a cyber alliance, make the free flow of information a part of all future trade agreements, and articulate an inclusive and robust vision of Internet governance.

Independent Task Force reports are consensus documents that offer analysis and policy prescriptions for major U.S. foreign policy issues facing the United States, developed through private and nonpartisan deliberations among a group of high-level experts.

See more in United States; Cybersecurity; Internet Policy

Event

Mobile's Rise in the Future of the Internet

Dominique Lazanski, director of Public Policy at GSMA, Robert Pepper, vice president of global technology policy at Cisco Systems, and Jonathan Spalter, chairman at Mobile Future, join Craig Mundie, senior advisor to the chief executive officer at Microsoft, to discuss technological change and the move to mobile devices.

See more in Global; Internet Policy

Must Read

Open Net Initiative: Internet Filtering in Yemen in 2004-2005 (PDF)

This report argues that while the Republic of Yemen substantially filters material on topics related to sex, sexuality and gambling, the state does not try to control broadly what its citizens see on the Internet. For instance, unlike certain other states that filter Internet content, Yemen does not block political content and its blocking of religious content is limited, focusing only on a small number of anti-Islam sites.

See more in Yemen; Censorship and Freedom of Speech; Internet Policy