Media and Foreign Policy

Interview

Education Will Foster Demand For International Journalism

Interview of: James O. Goldsborough

As part of the Edward R. Murrow 60th Anniversary initiative current and former fellows discuss the stories that have had the most impact and present ideas for sustaining serious international journalism. Former fellow James Goldsborough talks about the backlash of the Vietnam War felt in Western Europe and declares education as a way to foster demand for international journalism. For more on the initiative, visit cfr.org/murrow.

See more in Global; Education; Media and Foreign Policy

Interview

Foreign Affairs a 'Crucial Part of the News Diet'

Interview of: Clifford Krauss

As part of the Edward R. Murrow Press Fellowship 60th Anniversary initiative current and former fellows discuss the stories that have had the most impact and present ideas for sustaining serious international journalism. Former fellow Clifford Krauss considers the future of international journalism and recalls the "critical" year he spent at the Council on Foreign Relations. For more on the initiative, visit cfr.org/murrow.

See more in Media and Foreign Policy; United States

Interview

The Undercurrents of War Reporting

Interview of: Jane Arraf

As part of the Edward R. Murrow Press Fellowship 60th Anniversary initiative current and former fellows discuss the stories that have had the most impact and present ideas for sustaining serious international journalism. Former fellow Jane Arraf discusses the intensity and complications of covering a war and " the luxury of stepping back and taking a wider look," afforded to her by her fellowship at the Council on Foreign Relations. For more on the initiative, visit cfr.org/murrow.

See more in Media and Foreign Policy; Wars and Warfare

Interview

'Exhilirating': A Reporter's Experiences in International Journalism

Interview of: Thomas W. Lippman

As part of the Edward R. Murrow Press Fellowship 60th Anniversary initiative current and former fellows discuss the stories that have had the most impact and present ideas for sustaining serious international journalism. Former fellow Thomas Lippman discusses his time in Egypt during President Anwar Sadat's historic trip to Israel in 1977. For more on the initiative, visit cfr.org/murrow.

See more in Media and Foreign Policy; Global

Interview

Lessons Learned From Covering Iraq

Interview of: Mohamad Bazzi

As part of the Edward R. Murrow Press Fellowship 60th Anniversary initiative current and former fellows discuss the stories that have had the most impact and present ideas for sustaining serious international journalism. Former fellow Mohamad Bazzi looks back to his early coverage of the Iraq war and what it taught him about the importance of having many different news outlets covering the same story. For more on the initiative, visit cfr.org/murrow.

See more in Media and Foreign Policy; Iraq

Interview

'Dangerous Reporters' and the Impact of International Journalism

Interview of: David Remnick

As part of the Edward R. Murrow Press Fellowship 60th Anniversary initiative current and former fellows discuss the stories that have had the most impact and present ideas for sustaining serious international journalism. Former fellow David Remnick discusses his coverage of the fall of Communism, and the importance of "fearless" reporters who risk everything to "expose the unspeakable." For more on the initiative, visit cfr.org/murrow.

See more in Media and Foreign Policy; Global

Audio

War Zones: The Changing Environment for Foreign Correspondents (Audio)

Speakers: Kim Barker, Mohamad Bazzi, Christopher Dickey, and Kathy Gannon
Introductory Speaker: Richard N. Haass
Presider: Christiane Amanpour

Listen to former Edward R. Murrow press fellows analyze the difficulties associated with reporting from war zones based on their experiences.

This session was part of the Edward R. Murrow Press Fellowship 60th Anniversary Event, which was made possible through the generous support of the Ford Foundation and Time Warner, Inc.

See more in United States; Media and Foreign Policy

Interview

The Media as a Force for Public Accountability

Interview of: Elizabeth Rubin

As part of the Edward R. Murrow 60th Anniversary initiative current and former fellows discuss the stories that have had the most impact and present ideas for sustaining serious international journalism. Former fellow Elizabeth Rubin considers why she was blacklisted by the media department of the 101st Airborne Division. Using her experience covering the military she also explores possibilities for the future of international reporting at this time of upheaval. For more on the initiative, visit cfr.org/murrow.

See more in Media and Foreign Policy; Global

Interview

'No Easy Fix' to the State of Foreign Reporting

Interview of: Kim Barker

As part of the Edward R. Murrow Press Fellowship 60th Anniversary initiative current and former fellows discuss the stories that have had the most impact and present ideas for sustaining serious international journalism. Current fellow Kim Barker discusses her preference for covering "how people live, not just how they die." Barker also comments on the future of foreign reporting pointing out that sustaining it is not going to be cheap. For more on the initiative, visit cfr.org/murrow.

See more in Media and Foreign Policy; Global

Must Read

NY Review of Books: A New Horizon for the News

Author: Michael Massing

While the financial prospects of the American news business continues to look grim, statistics show interest in news has "rarely been greater." In this New York Review of Books article, Michael Massing tackles the paradox and why it's occuring. Massing also provides insight into how the news industry can benefit from its new and evolving structure.

See more in United States; Media and Foreign Policy

Must Read

NY Review of Books: The News About the Internet

Author: Michael Massing

In this New York Review of Books article, Michael Massing argues that the debate among editors and reporters on the detrimental effects of Web and blogger-based journalism are outdated. Instead, Massing writes, critics should realize that the practice of journalism is "being reinvented there." Furthermore, Massing writes, those editors and executives at our top papers who fail to take note will only "hasten their own demise."

See more in Global; Media and Foreign Policy