Globalization

Must Read

Washington Post: Why the Elites Are Rising Up

Author: Jackson Diehl

"[G]lobalization is not merely an economic story. It is accompanied by the spread of freer and more inclusive elections to dozens of countries where they were previously banned or rigged. That has enabled the rise of populists who cater to globalization's losers and who promise to crush the old establishment and even out the rewards. In country after country, they've succeeded in monopolizing the political system. Hence, the elite revolt."

See more in Global; Globalization; Political Movements and Protests

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Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies: Globalization and Military-Industrial Transformation in South Asia: An Historical Perspective

Author: Emrys Chew

This report by the Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies in Singapore examines the roots and ramifications of military-industrial globalization in South Asia, locating them firmly within the dynamic military cultural context of the subcontinent's history. In so doing, it stives to redress perceived imbalances in the contemporary emphasis of current debates about the nature and impact of globalizing supra-national forces. It also seeks to review possible implications of long-term trends and patterns for the future security of the region.

See more in Defense and Security; Globalization; Asia and Pacific

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Trading Places

Trading Places. Peter F. Drucker. National Interest, Spring 2005

The New world economy is fundamentally different from that of the fifty years following World War II. The United States may well remain the political and military leader for decades to come. It is likely also to remain the world's richest and most productive national economy for a long time (though the European Union as a whole is both larger and more productive). But the U.S. economy is no longer the single dominant economy...

See more in Trade; Globalization; Global

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Foreign Affairs: Campaign 2000: New World, New Deal: A Democratic Approach to Globalization

Authors: W. Bowman Cutter, Joan E. Spero, and Laura D'Andrea Tyson

The next Democratic president should build on Bill Clinton's legacy of embracing globalization and easing its downsides. This means developing a new system of global economic relations based on American leadership, open markets, engagement with China and other emerging markets, and stronger multilateral regimes to handle transnational challenges such as the environment, labor rights, and the information economy. A new world will need a global New Deal.

See more in United States; Globalization; Elections