NATO

Interview

NATO's Next Moves

Christopher S. Chivvis interviewed by Jonathan Masters

NATO's response to Russia's annexation of Crimea may require it to bolster eastern European members with both military and non-military actions, says expert Christopher S. Chivvis.

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Must Read

McKinsey: The Future of European Defence: Tackling the Productivity Challenge

"Europe is under pressure, both internally and from its allies, to take more responsibility for defence and security, especially in its immediate neighbourhood. The post-Cold War history of European deployments in Europe and joint NATO missions provide abundant evidence of such demands. Currently, US defence spending represents 72 percent of the NATO total – up from 63 percent in 2001."

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Interview

Canada's Security Agenda

Rear Admiral David Gardam interviewed by Toni Johnson

Canada's military is managing its role in Afghanistan against new security concerns in the Arctic, and is looking to increase its capacity in an age when other NATO countries are cutting back on spending, says Canadian Rear Admiral David Gardam.

See more in Defense and Security; NATO; Canada

Audio

Media Conference Call: The Chicago NATO Summit

Speaker: Ivo H. Daalder
Presiders: Gideon Rose and Rachel Bronson

Listen to U.S. Permanent Representative to NATO Ivo Daalder discuss the Chicago NATO Summit with Foreign Affairs editor Gideon Rose and the Chicago Council on Global Affairs' Rachel Bronson.

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Audio

Corporate Conference Call: Post-NATO Summit Analysis

Speakers: Ivo H. Daalder and Rachel Bronson
Presider: Gideon Rose

On Tuesday, May 22, Ivo Daalder, the U.S. Permanent Representative to NATO, will offer his take on the Chicago summit. The immediate question is whether the alliance can withdraw its forces from Afghanistan while leaving behind a stable country that can stave off the Taliban. The long-term question surrounds the future of NATO as a guarantor of international peace and security.

Daalder, in the March/April issue of Foreign Affairs, writes that the organization's successful mission to help liberate Libya proves that the alliance can still be an essential source of stability, but adds "to preserve that role, NATO must solidify the political cohesion and shared capabilities that made the operation in Libya possible."

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